An e-mail from Mike Hamilton regarding the ticket price increase

Dear Friends,

Today we announced a football ticket price increase for the 2006 season to allow us to keep pace with rising operation costs including facility maintenance and upgrades, utilities, security and tuition. I wanted to take this opportunity to explain it to you — our loyal supporters.


Mike Hamilton

We made a commitment in 2001 not to raise prices for five years despite our rising costs. Unfortunately the time has come when we have to make adjustments to our ticket prices to be able to continue to recruit, educate and train world-class student-athletes while continuing to operate without using tax or university dollars.

Season ticket prices have remained $38 per game since 2001. In 2004, we raised single game ticket prices for select home games to $45, but maintained season ticket prices at $38 each to minimize the impact on our season ticket holders.

Season ticket prices for standard seats for the 2006 football season will be $296 for seven home games — $44 for Cal, Florida, LSU and Alabama; $40 for Air Force, Marshall and Kentucky. (Chairback seat season tickets are $3 more per game.) Fourteen and a quarter percent, or approximately $37of the $296 season ticket price, is sales tax.

We will also be raising single game ticket prices for four of our seven home games (Cal, Florida, LSU and Alabama) from $45 to $50. Tickets for Air Force, Marshall and Kentucky will increase from $38 to $40.

We are always monitoring the national scene with regard to our ticket prices, and we've found that these prices are comparable to many of our peer institutions. For the 2005 football season, Alabama's ticket prices ranged from $40 — $50, Auburn ranged from $42 — $52, LSU ranged from $36 — $45, and Ole Miss ranged from $40 — $42. Notre Dame's tickets were $56; Ohio State's ticket price was $58, Oklahoma's price ranged from $52 — $75 and Texas' price ranged from $56 — $75.

The increases are projected to raise approximately $2.5 million, which will be used for facility improvements and to ensure UTAD can maintain financial independence from the university while continuing its tradition of giving back to the university.

As many of you know, the money generated from the football program allows all of our student-athletes — men and women — to have the opportunity to compete on a national level while achieving academic success.

Over the past three years, the men's athletics department has cut its operating budget by $3.5 million — from $24.06 million in 2003 to $20.51 million in 2005, but there are still rising costs that we cannot control, such as utilities and tuition.

We are very proud of the fact that the University of Tennessee athletics department is one of less than 10 departments in the country that receives no funds from state subsidies or taxes. Our funding is primarily through donations to the Volunteer Athletics & Scholarship Fund and Lady Vol Boost-Her Club as well as revenue from football, men's basketball and women's basketball. The only non-athletic department generated revenue is a $1 million contribution to women's athletics department coming from student fees. This a great accomplishment in today's college athletics landscape, and something we hope to continue for years to come.

I appreciate your continued support of Tennessee athletics. Your support provides our student-athletes with the opportunity to receive a first-class education while competing for championships.

Q&A

Why are ticket prices going up?
We made a commitment in 2001 not to raise prices for five years despite our rising costs such as facility maintenance and upgrades, utilities, security and tuition.

This decision was not made lightly, but we have to make adjustments to our ticket prices to be able to continue to recruit, educate and train world-class student-athletes while continuing to operate without using tax or university dollars.

Why the different prices for tickets?
By separating the pricing structure for season tickets and for games with teams who bring a large number of fans, this price increase will be paid primarily by visitors.

How do prices compare to other schools?
For the 2005 football season, Alabama's ticket prices ranged from $40 — $50, Auburn ranged from $42 — $52, LSU ranged from $36 — $45, and Ole Miss ranged from $40 — $42. Notre Dame's tickets were $56; Ohio State's ticket price was $58, Oklahoma's price ranged from $52 — $75 and Texas' price ranged from $56 — $75.

How much money will this raise and how will it be used?
The increases are projected to raise approximately $2.5 million, which will be used for facility improvements and to ensure UTAD can maintain financial independence from the university while continuing its tradition of giving back to the university.

How is UTAD funded?
The University of Tennessee athletics department is one of less than 10 departments in the country that receives no funds from state subsidies or taxes. UTAD is primarily funded by donations to the Volunteer Athletics & Scholarship Fund and Lady Vol Boost-Her Club as well as revenue from football, men's basketball and women's basketball. The only non-athletic department generated revenue is a $1 million contribution to women's athletics department coming from student fees.

What is UTAD doing to control costs?
Under Mike Hamilton's leadership, the men's athletics department has cut its operating budget by $3.5 million — from $24.06 million in 2003 to $20.51 million in 2005. For fiscal year 2006, athletics has implemented a zero-based budgeting model.


Go Vols!

Mike Hamilton
Men's Athletic Director

© 2006 govolsxtra.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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