NCAA says camps off limits for media

The NCAA has decided college sports camps aren’t the place for media.

A message from Greg Sankey of the SEC disclosed a recent interpretation handed down by the NCAA concerning the presence of media at college athletic camps for high school students. The text of the message was released by the University of Tennessee sports information office Thursday.

Although a rule banning media attendance at the camps colleges conduct for high school athletes has been on the books since 2007, a large loophole caused a sometimes loose interpretation.

“The rule said you can’t invite media to these camps,” explained UT associate athletics director Brad Bertani, “however, if camps were left open to the general public then it was OK (for media to attend).”

At UT, for example, the recent football camp conducted by coach Lane Kiffin’s staff was open, while the men’s basketball camp was essentially closed.

“An institution has an obligation to preclude the presence of media (including scouting services) at its institutional camps for the purpose of writing stories, filming and/or taking pictures,” the NCAA states. “... As a result, we advise you to notify media outlets they are not permitted to be present at institutional camps.”

John Painter of the UT sports information office said the ruling came after discussion with several athletic conferences, after widely varying interpretations at “more than 20 schools” across the country.

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Comments » 22

RJ_Vol writes:

I wonder what their rules state about paying players through textbook returns?

The media will just have to "vacate" the campus at these camps.

NoogaVol55 writes:

I feel like this may be a disadvantage for some of these high school kids. Whether you want to believe it or not, a lot of the exposure they get from recruiting services/local media can help them gain interest from colleges. By effectively cutting off media from these events, it only limits their chances of getting noticed by more colleges. Take the DB from New Orleans who came to UT's camp as an unknown....two days later he was featured on the front page of Rivals.com.

gohawks1 writes:

Looks like this one would be hard to enforce. They don't all wear big ole identification badges on their shirts, you know. Camera equipment is one thing, but exactly how do you recognize writers and scouts?

nicksjuzunk#646117 writes:

in response to NoogaVol55:

I feel like this may be a disadvantage for some of these high school kids. Whether you want to believe it or not, a lot of the exposure they get from recruiting services/local media can help them gain interest from colleges. By effectively cutting off media from these events, it only limits their chances of getting noticed by more colleges. Take the DB from New Orleans who came to UT's camp as an unknown....two days later he was featured on the front page of Rivals.com.

You are exactly right. And this really sucks for us as fans. It is going to be hard to get a feel for things without media coverage there.

TommyJack writes:

in response to gohawks1:

Looks like this one would be hard to enforce. They don't all wear big ole identification badges on their shirts, you know. Camera equipment is one thing, but exactly how do you recognize writers and scouts?

You can recognize the KNS boys by the cheap haircuts.

byobbio writes:

WOuld it be a secondary violation or, what would they call something more? Major violation? Mortal violation?

I just feel sorry for the players who can't get interviewed by Jimmy Hyams. The world loses on this one, i'm afraid.
BYOBBIO

al2476 writes:

The NCAA says this is not to be done but selling textbooks is just a light tap on the hand.

NobodyCares (Inactive) writes:

Sheesh! Welcome to the world of college sports in Amerika.

When are they going to make rules that say PA, radio, and TV announcers can not use the students name in play-by-play calls? Student privacy ya know!

Probably also need a rule that every player who dresses for a game gets at least 10 minutes of playing time and no player can play more than 20 minutes a game? Equal rights ya' know!

cybervol writes:

It's not their fault. How is a bama player supposed to know what to do with a text book?

gohawks1 writes:

in response to TommyJack:

You can recognize the KNS boys by the cheap haircuts.

You may have a point, there. I think I found a pic of one of them waiting outside the gates at Neyland. Notice he's already taking notes and he ain't even in the stands yet.

http://www.imdb.com/media/rm146839808...

AllVol1 writes:

Thou shalt not blow thy smoke machines within the perceptual radius of thy recruits.
Thou shalt not mention the names of thy recruits to press.
Thou shalt not have professional pictures taken of thy campers.

If thou dost worship in these ways before the golden calf of NCAA prohibited activities, preparest thou for my vengeful wrath! For I am a furious NCAA, and a jealous NCAA, and shall rain down wristslaps and secondary violation notations and very, very, very strong verbal reprimands upon those who stray from my decreed path. Preparest thou thy soul for judgment and punishment!

InertGas writes:

Could this be a violation of the 1st amendment ?

voloffaith writes:

Thought I sent this in the Jones article unless it was vaporized. I was saying in the missing post that I wanted to apologize for my on topic posts that were hippocritical/non-caring/potentially abusive(depending on how responder saw and read into it). My intentions henceforth will be to respond on topic to post whether I agree with posters in a nonconfrontational manner so as to encourage constructive dialogue amongst Vol fans and those who are not.

On topic, media at a camp could help a player get noticed,but if we offer an unknown others will notice and get someone out to watch them at their school. So some can fall under the radar,but not many will due to the highly competitive nature of recruiting these days.

stevefrommemphis writes:

Alabama has now been put on probation (Probation # 3) for violations which occurred during a period of time when Alabama was on probation (Probation # 2) for committing violations which occurred during a period of time when Alabama was on probation (Probation #1). Two separate transgressions WHILE ON PROBATION FOR OFFENSES BEGINNING AS FAR BACK AS 1993.

THE ALABAMA FREEDOM CLOCK
http://spuat.wickens.ws/
The ALABAMA FREEDOM CLOCK has not yet been reset to account for the latest probation. This clock was in perpetual countdown from February 1, 2002 through January 31, 2007, the period of probation #2 (during which the textbook scandal occurred).

http://audrumline.tripod.com/bammerha...
Need an update to the above web site also....

February 1, 2002, when Probation #2 was announced
"They were absolutely staring down the barrel of a gun. These violations are some of the worst, most serious that have ever occurred," said Thomas Yeager, chairman of the infractions committee. If Alabama is found guilty of further violations during the probationary period, Yeager suggested the death penalty -- the elimination of a sports program -- could result. "God forbid, there's ever another appearance -- ever," Yeager said. "Should there be one -- particularly within the five-year period -- I don't know what's left."

My conclusion: ALABAMA SHOULD HAVE RECEIVED THE DEATH PENALTY.

Typical Alabama fan's conclusion: PHIL FULMER is responsible for ALL ALABAMA TRANSGRESSIONS

the10sevol writes:

did l'il nicky go cryin' to slive after his star qb recruit attended our camp and it was picked up by the national media? just curious....

belayvol writes:

This will mean nothing. The bloggers are the real media these days. A lot of them work for the scouting agencies. They will just be fans and blog the results which will let the recruiting services do evaluations. The mainstream media will be sucking wind and copying the bloggers.

the10sevol writes:

of course you're right belay, i just really enjoyed all the video that came out of the first camps, and wanted to see footage of the qb's (scroggins in particular).

belayvol writes:

in response to the10sevol:

of course you're right belay, i just really enjoyed all the video that came out of the first camps, and wanted to see footage of the qb's (scroggins in particular).

I think there will still be video. Just not as much or as high of quality. I will be surprised if some large news organization does not file suit about this as freedom of press or some other issue.

the10sevol writes:

hope you're right, and quick! camp is next week, right? 18th & 19th?

the10sevol writes:

anybody wanna talk about a class action suit, that as taxpayers and paying fans, we are subsidizing this program at a state university, and under sunshine laws, should be allowed to witness the proceedings?
where's lawyer vol when we need him? dang!
GBO

pdhuff#552644 writes:

How many days, Ashley?

johnlg00 writes:

in response to stevefrommemphis:

Alabama has now been put on probation (Probation # 3) for violations which occurred during a period of time when Alabama was on probation (Probation # 2) for committing violations which occurred during a period of time when Alabama was on probation (Probation #1). Two separate transgressions WHILE ON PROBATION FOR OFFENSES BEGINNING AS FAR BACK AS 1993.

THE ALABAMA FREEDOM CLOCK
http://spuat.wickens.ws/
The ALABAMA FREEDOM CLOCK has not yet been reset to account for the latest probation. This clock was in perpetual countdown from February 1, 2002 through January 31, 2007, the period of probation #2 (during which the textbook scandal occurred).

http://audrumline.tripod.com/bammerha...
Need an update to the above web site also....

February 1, 2002, when Probation #2 was announced
"They were absolutely staring down the barrel of a gun. These violations are some of the worst, most serious that have ever occurred," said Thomas Yeager, chairman of the infractions committee. If Alabama is found guilty of further violations during the probationary period, Yeager suggested the death penalty -- the elimination of a sports program -- could result. "God forbid, there's ever another appearance -- ever," Yeager said. "Should there be one -- particularly within the five-year period -- I don't know what's left."

My conclusion: ALABAMA SHOULD HAVE RECEIVED THE DEATH PENALTY.

Typical Alabama fan's conclusion: PHIL FULMER is responsible for ALL ALABAMA TRANSGRESSIONS

I think this just shows that, in today's college football world, the NCAA and certainly the SEC has determined that Alabama football is "too big to fail". Unless something much worse surfaces, all future penalties against them will be of the wrist-slap variety. Nearly everybody else had better watch out, though, because the NCAA can't allow itself to be seen as a TOTAL pushover.

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