No matter the bowl, slice still the same for SEC teams

UT hoping to break even for trip to Nashville

Though the payouts at the nine SEC-affiliated bowl games vary widely, the participating teams receive largely concrete payments depending on what category its game falls under before the rest is divvied throughout the conference.

Category 1: Payouts of $1.5 million or less

n Participating institution receives $925,000

Bowls: BBVA Compass Bowl (Birmingham, Ala.), Liberty Bowl (Memphis)

Category 2: Payouts between $1.5 million and $3.99 million

n Participating institution receives $1.125 million

Bowls: Music City Bowl (Nashville), Chick-fil-A Bowl (Atlanta), Outback Bowl (Tampa, Fla.), Cotton Bowl (Dallas), Gator Bowl (Jacksonville, Fla.)

Category 3: Payouts between $4 million and $6 million

n Participating institutions receive $1.325 million

Bowls: Capital One Bowl (Orlando)

Category 4: Payouts over $6 million

n Participating institutions receive $1.825 million ($1.925 million for national championship game)

Bowls: BCS bowls

Source: SEC

Tennessee has been shrewd at managing its bowl finances over the past few years, often making a small amount of money or coming close to breaking even before it receives its cut of the SEC's large pool of bowl money.

Jan, 2, 2004 Peach Bowl

Revenues: $999,353.00

Expenses: $838,482.93

Jan. 1, 2005 Cotton Bowl

Revenues: $1,247,631.00

Expenses: $1,238,644.79

Jan. 1, 2007 Outback Bowl

Revenues: $1,283,584.62

Expenses: $1,232,531.47

Jan. 1, 2008 Outback Bowl

Revenues: $1,473,076.92

Expenses: $1,367,899.36

*UT received $196,950 from the SEC's Bowl Revenue Protection Insurance plan for unsold tickets.

Jan. 1, 2010 Chick-fil-A Bowl

Revenues: $1,285,262.00

Expenses: $1,094,616.18

Dec. 30, 2010 Music City Bowl

Projected revenues: $1,161,000.00

Projected expenses: To be determined

Source: University of Tennessee athletic department

Tennessee may have lost a bit of notoriety when it was passed up by the New Year's Day Gator Bowl in favor of Mississippi State, but it didn't lose any potential earnings by dropping one spot to the Music City Bowl.

Even though the Gator Bowl in Jacksonville, Fla., pays out $2.2 million to its SEC participant and the Music City Bowl in Nashville offers $2.15 million, the Vols would have received the same lump sum of $1.125 million, regardless.

Really, the Vols could have qualified for the Outback Bowl or Chick-fil-A Bowl - both of which make their selections before the Gator Bowl and Music City Bowl - and they still would have received the same payout from the SEC, according to the league's bowl revenue distribution formula.

The SEC breaks down the 10 potential bowl games it affiliates itself with into four categories, each of which provides the participant with a set lump sum before it divides the rest 13 ways - one for each of the 12 SEC teams, including itself, and one to the league office.

For bowls that pay out $1.5 million or less, the SEC participant retains $925,000. Though some figures are yet to be determined, the only bowls that fall into this category are the BBVA Compass Bowl (Birmingham, Ala.) and the Memphis-based Liberty Bowl.

The second category, which comprises bowls that pay between $1.5 million and $3.99 million, includes half of the SEC-affiliated bowls.

SEC participants in the Music City Bowl (UT), Gator Bowl (Mississippi State), Outback Bowl (Florida), Chick-fil-A Bowl (South Carolina) and Cotton Bowl (LSU) will receive the same $1.125 million check even though their respective payouts vary by as much as $1 million.

The Capital One Bowl, which will pit Alabama against Michigan State this year, is in its own category. Its payout has typically hovered around $4.25 million over the past few years, making it one of the top-paying non-BCS bowls in the country, but its SEC participant receives just $1.325 million before the rest is divided among the conference.

Arkansas will receive $1.825 million off the top of a Sugar Bowl payment that will clear $6 million. Auburn, because it advanced to the national championship, will haul in $1.925 million before the rest of college football's biggest payout is distributed to the rest of its colleagues.

After the SEC office took its cut, the grand total from the 10 bowls last year amounted to close to $26.5 million, SEC Associate Commissioner Charles Bloom said.

Divide that 12 ways, and each school received close to $2.21 million after receiving its original payout - if it qualified for the postseason.

That figure typically represents the profit SEC schools net for making a postseason bowl game.

Before that point, a school such as UT is usually hoping just to break even.

Barring any unforeseen costs, which have certainly arisen in the recent past, that's what UT is projecting for this year's trip, said Bill Myers, UT's senior associate athletic director and chief financial officer.

"I feel good about that," Myers said. "I can't tell you what I think we'll get but I feel pretty good that it will come in under that number."

Since the 2004 trip to the Chick-fil-A Bowl, the Vols have yet to lose money at the point when they receive their original payout and the 1/13th cut from that specific bowl, according to financial documents provided to the News Sentinel.

The closest UT came to spending more than it earned from the bowl itself were its back-to-back trips to the Outback Bowl in 2007 and 2008. Without the $111,784.62 it earned from its 1/13th cut, UT would have lost close to $50,000 in its 2007 trip to Tampa.

After the Vols didn't sell out their ticket allotment for the 2008 Outback Bowl, they would have lost more than $225,000 if not for the $196,950 it received from the SEC's Bowl Revenue Protection Insurance plan.

According to league bylaws, "the cost of unused tickets up to 3,000 tickets for games with a ticket guarantee under 15,000 tickets, and up to 4,000 tickets for games with a ticket guarantee of 15,000 tickets or above, shall be deducted prior to conference distribution."

The Vols have sold out their allotment with ease in their past two bowl trips, as the majority of the 16,000 tickets they were given for this year's Music City Bowl were reserved long before they were officially paired with North Carolina for the Dec. 30 game (TV: ESPN, 6:30 p.m.).

"It really helps when you sell all the tickets," Myers said.

UT's close proximity to Nashville also makes this year's bowl trip easier to budget, Myers said.

For the Outback Bowl trips, UT flew the team and "other working party members that needed to be there" on one plane and then flew the "official party," which included high-ranking administration members and other staff, a few days later on a second flight.

For this year's trip to Nashville, UT will offer its staff members $.40 a mile and pay players the greater of either the cost of a one-way flight from their hometown to Nashville or one-way mileage from the same locations.

Myers estimated players will receive between $350 and $500 in travel allowance.

"There are substantial travel savings for not having to fly," Myers said.

The SEC pays its teams $200 per mile it travels one way to its bowl site, which will give UT another $36,000 to work with, Myers said.

"Our payment will be $1.161 million roughly," Myers said. "Our goal is to spend less than that."

UT will spend around $26,000 a night and between $100,000 and $130,000 total to lodge the team at the official Music City Bowl hotel, the Gaylord Opryland Hotel, Myers said. An additional $30,000 or so will be spent to house the marching band at the Holiday Inn Vanderbilt.

Last year's hotel bill in Atlanta was around $415,000 and the previous year's in Tampa was close to $420,000, Myers said.

On the "low end," Myers estimated that UT will spend between $50,000 and $60,000 to feed the team while it's in Nashville from Dec. 26 through Dec. 30.

UT will oblige the NCAA's option to provide team members with a bowl gift that is valued at no more than $350 per person to go along with the $500 gift bundle players will receive from the Music City Bowl, Myers said.

Unforeseen costs can and have popped up.

On one of the Outback Bowl trips, the Vols held their practices at the University of Tampa.

Upon arriving for the first on-site practice, UT officials were surprised to learn it owed $20,000 to rent the facility.

"Costs like that pop up," Myers said.

Andrew Gribble covers Tennessee football and recruiting. He may be reached at 865-342-6327. Follow him at http://twitter.com/Andrew_Gribble and http://blogs.knoxnews.com/gribble/

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Comments » 27

ncvol17 writes:

Read above to see why Vandy stays in the SEC. Like a government handout they cash the yearly check and do nothing to earn any of it year in and out.

mikethehistorystudent writes:

Why hasn't this place mentioned the new head coach for Florida, Will Muschamp? I have confidence he can lead Florida to great defeats. Next year we're gonna snack on some gator tail in the swamp. As for this article, yeah bowl money does help.

tnsportsman writes:

LOL damn did everyone have their calculator out on this cost breakdown, LOL. My head hurts now, Crown Time!

GO VOLS, BEAT NC and the money will work itself out!

GO VOLS, WE ARE UT!

mikethehistorystudent writes:

in response to ncvol17:

Read above to see why Vandy stays in the SEC. Like a government handout they cash the yearly check and do nothing to earn any of it year in and out.

I'm glad that Vandy is in the SEC. They make other teams' records look better. Our schedule is hard enough. I hope they stay and they just keep on sucking. Without them we may not have made it to a bowl game this year.

abnerPeabody writes:

That is a lot of money to spend on a 300 mile round trip.50 or 60 thousand food bill.Wow,I could feed my wife for the next 20 years for less than that and eat quiet well.That may be why Fulmer spends so much time at the Golden Corral and Crispy Creme.

mikethehistorystudent writes:

in response to abnerPeabody:

That is a lot of money to spend on a 300 mile round trip.50 or 60 thousand food bill.Wow,I could feed my wife for the next 20 years for less than that and eat quiet well.That may be why Fulmer spends so much time at the Golden Corral and Crispy Creme.

I like Fulmer, but that's funny.

pkaplan writes:

in response to mikethehistorystudent:

Why hasn't this place mentioned the new head coach for Florida, Will Muschamp? I have confidence he can lead Florida to great defeats. Next year we're gonna snack on some gator tail in the swamp. As for this article, yeah bowl money does help.

It was a story on Saturday at 8:14 p.m. Old news now.
http://www.govolsxtra.com/news/2010/d...

VolinCalif writes:

in response to ncvol17:

Read above to see why Vandy stays in the SEC. Like a government handout they cash the yearly check and do nothing to earn any of it year in and out.

NC You know very well what you say isn't true. Vandy helps send SEC teams to a bowl every year! So they've done their share.

volfaninutah writes:

I think it is ironic that for all the years Spurrier teased Tennessee about the Citrus Bowl,that now we find the Chik-filet bowl had to invite Gamecocks for the chicken menu item. I'm just sayin' What goes around.......

Lostvolinhighweeds writes:

in response to VolinCalif:

NC You know very well what you say isn't true. Vandy helps send SEC teams to a bowl every year! So they've done their share.

You're right. They helped everyone they played this year except Ole Miss.

mbible1utk#324980 writes:

I think I know why tickets cost so much now.... would it hurt to cut back to sackfuls of Krystal or something?

Brillovol writes:

in response to volman2010:

(This comment was removed by the site staff.)

You're gettin in deep on this topic. Bowl idea ain't half bad, but a pro team would suck energy out of the college team.

As for the topic at hand, good article for the financial guys.

CroKev writes:

in response to AF1A4:

(This comment was removed by the site staff.)

Enlightenment entails exposure of darkness and that explains the recent election results. Is "blue" relevant anywhere besides the Left coast (even New Englanders are starting to get it)?

Mule_Days_King writes:

in response to AF1A4:

(This comment was removed by the site staff.)

How about this? You can handle the "enlightenment" for the rest of us. We will handle the "common sense" part for you.

Go Vols.

cloudodust writes:

in response to mbible1utk#324980:

I think I know why tickets cost so much now.... would it hurt to cut back to sackfuls of Krystal or something?

Cost and effect. Reminds me of hearing a spectator at a marathon remark about the runners, " And to think, they actually paid good money to do this..!"

Mule_Days_King writes:

Glad that the Opryland Hotel is back and better than ever since the flooding. Hope both teams enjoy their stay.
It's a beautiful place during the holidays and my family has made it a tradition to visit there during Christmas time.
Can't wait to see my Vols in Nashvegas!!

FWBVol writes:

in response to volman2010:

(This comment was removed by the site staff.)

Actually there have not been a huge amount of tax dollars spent on Neyland Stadium dating back to the earliest years in the 1920s when a Knoxville banker paid for the original site of the stadium and students and faculty helped prepare and build the original stadium. Thus we have Shield Watkins Field surrounded by Neyland Stadium.

Throughout the years every expansion that I know of has been paid for by the UTAD. Some of them those expansions have been through typical financing such as bonds and such, but any money the UTAD might have received in that way has been paid back to the state with interest.

That brings up an interesting point that a state university can pay off its own facilities, but billionaires need state and federal money to build their mega structures.

Tourism isn't necessarily the answer to the economy. Industry is. I live in a tourist/military driven area, and believe me when the economy is down people don't come to the beaches. Look at Orlando with all the theme parks in central Florida or the Tampa area with a NFL team, MLB team and tourism attractions and see how the economy is doing there.

Industry is what drives the economy of a community not sports or tourism. Tourism jobs for the most part are seasonal in many areas that's why Six Flags over Georgia is closed during most winter months.

Vol86 writes:

in response to AF1A4:

(This comment was removed by the site staff.)

first you need to get a clue

YoungUtAlum writes:

in response to volman2010:

(This comment was removed by the site staff.)

Taking economic advice from you would be the equivalent of me going over to the salvation army and taking a poll of what the homeless population thinks we should do. Do you read the news paper or watch television? I forgot they probably dont have tv's over at the salvation army. Knoxville is in the top 50 cities to do business in the nation. Also, the most important thing about bowl games is filling the stadium and you would be hard pressed to fill 102,000 seat stadium for a non BCS bowl.

YoungUtAlum writes:

in response to AF1A4:

(This comment was removed by the site staff.)

Sir, Knoxville has flourished under a Red Mayor more so than any mayor before. You are more than welcome to keep your opinions but you are obviously in the minority and probably need enlightenment yourself. As far as state wide, the vastly blue state of Michigan sure has done well financially. But then again, they are probably more enlightened than us measly southern, unenlightened rednecks from Tennessee.

volsfannsc writes:

in response to FWBVol:

Actually there have not been a huge amount of tax dollars spent on Neyland Stadium dating back to the earliest years in the 1920s when a Knoxville banker paid for the original site of the stadium and students and faculty helped prepare and build the original stadium. Thus we have Shield Watkins Field surrounded by Neyland Stadium.

Throughout the years every expansion that I know of has been paid for by the UTAD. Some of them those expansions have been through typical financing such as bonds and such, but any money the UTAD might have received in that way has been paid back to the state with interest.

That brings up an interesting point that a state university can pay off its own facilities, but billionaires need state and federal money to build their mega structures.

Tourism isn't necessarily the answer to the economy. Industry is. I live in a tourist/military driven area, and believe me when the economy is down people don't come to the beaches. Look at Orlando with all the theme parks in central Florida or the Tampa area with a NFL team, MLB team and tourism attractions and see how the economy is doing there.

Industry is what drives the economy of a community not sports or tourism. Tourism jobs for the most part are seasonal in many areas that's why Six Flags over Georgia is closed during most winter months.

I normally don't agree with a lot of what you post- but this one is spot on! Industry is everything. Good industry revenues will roll over at least seven times before leaving the county or region. Your point about the billionaires is so correct. They have learned to abuse the system rather than contribute to it. In America, the rich DO keep getting richer.

murrayvol writes:

in response to AF1A4:

(This comment was removed by the site staff.)

Have you ever whacked a hornet's nest with a stick? Get ready.

murrayvol writes:

in response to FWBVol:

Actually there have not been a huge amount of tax dollars spent on Neyland Stadium dating back to the earliest years in the 1920s when a Knoxville banker paid for the original site of the stadium and students and faculty helped prepare and build the original stadium. Thus we have Shield Watkins Field surrounded by Neyland Stadium.

Throughout the years every expansion that I know of has been paid for by the UTAD. Some of them those expansions have been through typical financing such as bonds and such, but any money the UTAD might have received in that way has been paid back to the state with interest.

That brings up an interesting point that a state university can pay off its own facilities, but billionaires need state and federal money to build their mega structures.

Tourism isn't necessarily the answer to the economy. Industry is. I live in a tourist/military driven area, and believe me when the economy is down people don't come to the beaches. Look at Orlando with all the theme parks in central Florida or the Tampa area with a NFL team, MLB team and tourism attractions and see how the economy is doing there.

Industry is what drives the economy of a community not sports or tourism. Tourism jobs for the most part are seasonal in many areas that's why Six Flags over Georgia is closed during most winter months.

Good post. Maybe most of the troops will read it.

Mule_Days_King writes:

in response to AF1A4:

(This comment was removed by the site staff.)

Man, you just keep digging the hole deeper.

YoungUtAlum writes:

in response to AF1A4:

(This comment was removed by the site staff.)

Isn't it a mayor's responsibility to make his/her city their personal project? Im pretty sure the biggest spenders and conjurers of money right now are the dems. Our current president has spent more than any of the former presidents combined. If you want your dollar to actually be worth something by the time you have grandkids (if you don't already that is) then you better open your eyes. Im extremely thankful for shrewd business men like Haslam who also won by a landslide for governor so he must of been doing something right. If you haven't go down town and look at all the life Haslam has pumped into it. When I was a kid i was scared to go downtown because of all the filth. Im pretty sure you are living in the wrong state buddy and also have had your head in the sand for the past couple years concerning our government spending problems and who is at the helm.

Chartervol writes:

in response to volman2010:

(This comment was removed by the site staff.)

Neyland Stadium was not built with tax money.

UTbassdrummer writes:

So. Much. Money.

Zzzzz Zzzzzz Zzzzzzz

Go Vols.

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