Doctors at Indiana clear Negedu, but school won't

Other schools still showing interest

Former Tennessee basketball player Emmanuel Negedu said Indiana University doctors cleared him to return to play athletically, but the school's administration declined.

Negedu said he was disappointed with the news, but was not prepared to discuss his situation any further on Thursday.

The 6-foot-7 Negedu, who suffered a cardiac event on Sept. 28 and subsequently had an ICD implanted in his chest, still hopes to return to playing Division I college basketball.

A source close to the situation said a number of schools are still showing interest including New Mexico, UTEP, Nebraska, UNLV, Arizona and Memphis.

Negedu, 21, has a three years of eligibility remaining and would file a waiver from the NCAA to be eligible to play next season.

Tyler Returns: Former UT player Tyler Smith, who was suspended from the team this season after a Jan. 1 traffic stop, has returned to the United States earlier this week after playing out his first professional season in Turkey.

Smith averaged 18.6 points, 7.4 rebounds and 4.5 assists per game in the TBL.

"It's a very different game over there,'' Smith said. "Over here, they let you take that extra step, but over there you can't. Also, you can knock the ball out of the cylinder before it goes down.''

Smith said he will return to Nashville to work out at the D1 Academy while his agent looks at potential deals.

"If I can make it in the NBA, that's great, but I'm just happy to be able to do something I love,'' Smith said.

In addition to offers from the TBL, Smith has received interest from the professional league in Spain where former UT great Chris Lofton is playing.

Smith, like Lofton, followed the Vols' run in the NCAA tournament.

"I watched every game from the SEC tourney on after buying an online pass,'' Smith said. "Some nights I was up until 3 or 4.

"It was great watching the guys overcome everything and fight back and win all of those games.''

Smith said he's considering playing in the Pilot Rocky Top League, which will begin play at Bearden High School in just over a month.

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Comments » 53

volfanmo writes:

first

volman0529 writes:

Glad to hear Tyler is doing well! Hope he does play in the Rocky Top League. I see he is taking ( and making) three point shots overseas. If he can improve his outside game then he could make it in the NBA.

volman0529 writes:

That sucks for E-man. He will find someplace to play but he needs to understand that his "LIFE" is more important than a basketball Game.

civilianvol_formerly_marinevol writes:

Did anyone from KNS happen to ask the UT administration why they won't let him play when he has been cleared by his doctors? Must be some reason other than his health.

volman0529 writes:

in response to civilianvol_formerly_marinevol:

Did anyone from KNS happen to ask the UT administration why they won't let him play when he has been cleared by his doctors? Must be some reason other than his health.

What he had was undetectable. Therefore he could still have another attack even if he seems fine now. There is too much liability for him to keep playing. No university will want that cloud over their heads. He will end up playing somewhere but probably not at a "Elite" program.

golfballs03 writes:

I hope Emmanuel stays healthy and safe! I wonder how doctors can continue to clear him, yet administrators think they know better? Anyway, I hope everything works out for him.

AtLeastMyTeamHasPerfectSeasons writes:

in response to civilianvol_formerly_marinevol:

Did anyone from KNS happen to ask the UT administration why they won't let him play when he has been cleared by his doctors? Must be some reason other than his health.

If you listened to VOlCalls a few weeks back they explained that doctor-after-doctor DID NOT clear him, but he kept getting 2nd, 4th and 19th opinions till one finally said yes, he can play. This was after everyone the University had check him out said he couldn't play.

One Nick Riviera (Simpson's unlicensed DR) doctor's opinion don't make it right to play him.

orangevolz writes:

in response to civilianvol_formerly_marinevol:

Did anyone from KNS happen to ask the UT administration why they won't let him play when he has been cleared by his doctors? Must be some reason other than his health.

Wow....you can't figure that one out? Pretty obvious to me. Health and liability concerns. No way UT should allow him play.

BillsBrother writes:

in response to AtLeastMyTeamHasPerfectSeasons:

If you listened to VOlCalls a few weeks back they explained that doctor-after-doctor DID NOT clear him, but he kept getting 2nd, 4th and 19th opinions till one finally said yes, he can play. This was after everyone the University had check him out said he couldn't play.

One Nick Riviera (Simpson's unlicensed DR) doctor's opinion don't make it right to play him.

So you are saying Dr Nick cleared him?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aqImkD...

pdhuff#552644 writes:

Sad situation for the young man.

Maybe Memphis is the answer.

TennesseeTuxedo writes:

Enough with the Tyler Smith updates. He thought so much of his team mates that he got arrested and kicked off of the team and out of school. Enough. Focus on the kids who left this school with some positives instead.

golfballs03 writes:

school administrators know better than doctors

keepitreal4vols writes:

in response to civilianvol_formerly_marinevol:

Did anyone from KNS happen to ask the UT administration why they won't let him play when he has been cleared by his doctors? Must be some reason other than his health.

The ICD device saved his life and will help his heart beat on. It's not intended nor designed to allow a human to do aerobic exercise and sustain 180-200 beats per minute while running up and down a gym floor. This device was implanted to help him live a healthy life, not continue playing basketball or running marathons. I truely feel for him and his desire to play ball but UT 100% did the right thing.

cdonsbach writes:

Basketball isn't worth an early death, E-Man. Stay at UT, get your degree, and let Thunder Thorton or Jim Haslam give you a 6-figure job once you graduate. Your life isn't something to gamble with; don't make a stupid decision, dude.

always_vol (Inactive) writes:

in response to cdonsbach:

Basketball isn't worth an early death, E-Man. Stay at UT, get your degree, and let Thunder Thorton or Jim Haslam give you a 6-figure job once you graduate. Your life isn't something to gamble with; don't make a stupid decision, dude.

I'm going to play devil's advocate here....
so many young people lose their lives in TOTALLY senseless ways:
-car accidents
-disease
-suicide
-murder
and, saddest of all,
war.

Here, we have a young man who wants nothing more than to play a sport. He knows there is a risk, but I have to admire him. What if he died playing basketball?? Well, it'd be tragic. On the other hand, he died doing something fun.

As I get older, and close enough to start watching all the relatives croak from cancer, heart disease, depression, neglect.....

there are very much worse ways to go than dying young doing something you enjoy.

keepitreal4vols writes:

in response to always_vol:

I'm going to play devil's advocate here....
so many young people lose their lives in TOTALLY senseless ways:
-car accidents
-disease
-suicide
-murder
and, saddest of all,
war.

Here, we have a young man who wants nothing more than to play a sport. He knows there is a risk, but I have to admire him. What if he died playing basketball?? Well, it'd be tragic. On the other hand, he died doing something fun.

As I get older, and close enough to start watching all the relatives croak from cancer, heart disease, depression, neglect.....

there are very much worse ways to go than dying young doing something you enjoy.

Couldn't think of a better way to spend my Tuesday nights with my children watching players die on the Basketball floor. It will be just like the horse races, run the ambulance out there, load him up and finish the game like nothing happened. We got 12 deep on the bench, so what if we lose 1. Maybe Vegas will put out odds on how many games before his heart explodes and then we can all get rich off his death. But hey, at least we will be on Sportscenter that night...
Geeez, what is wrong with you?

rclarkvols#224537 writes:

in response to always_vol:

I'm going to play devil's advocate here....
so many young people lose their lives in TOTALLY senseless ways:
-car accidents
-disease
-suicide
-murder
and, saddest of all,
war.

Here, we have a young man who wants nothing more than to play a sport. He knows there is a risk, but I have to admire him. What if he died playing basketball?? Well, it'd be tragic. On the other hand, he died doing something fun.

As I get older, and close enough to start watching all the relatives croak from cancer, heart disease, depression, neglect.....

there are very much worse ways to go than dying young doing something you enjoy.

One question. Would you let him play if he were your son?

golfballs03 writes:

doctors don't know anything

mrvol2u writes:

in response to pdhuff#552644:

Sad situation for the young man.

Maybe Memphis is the answer.

No, please anywhere but Memphis. I hope he will see the reality of the situation and take UT up on the scholarship and finish his education.

mrvol2u writes:

in response to rclarkvols#224537:

One question. Would you let him play if he were your son?

No. I would not. That is the problem with sports today, people place too much importance on them at just about every level.

Sometimes life is just unfair. This is one of those times and no matter how hard he tries, he probably will not find a place to play.

Good kid having a tough time right now. I hope and pray he has some strong friends and family close by to help him through this.

tennrich1 writes:

I have the upmost respect for this young man, but any team that allows him to play is taking a HUGH risk, not only for Emmanuel but also for their reputation if something happens...I feel sorry for him....he's a great kid...

tennrich1 writes:

in response to always_vol:

I'm going to play devil's advocate here....
so many young people lose their lives in TOTALLY senseless ways:
-car accidents
-disease
-suicide
-murder
and, saddest of all,
war.

Here, we have a young man who wants nothing more than to play a sport. He knows there is a risk, but I have to admire him. What if he died playing basketball?? Well, it'd be tragic. On the other hand, he died doing something fun.

As I get older, and close enough to start watching all the relatives croak from cancer, heart disease, depression, neglect.....

there are very much worse ways to go than dying young doing something you enjoy.

One question...."saddest of all-war".....
Man you need to come work the midnight shift in the neighborhood I work and ask the young man killed by murder if its as sad as someone getting killed in war...

VolInSabanLand writes:

in response to always_vol:

I'm going to play devil's advocate here....
so many young people lose their lives in TOTALLY senseless ways:
-car accidents
-disease
-suicide
-murder
and, saddest of all,
war.

Here, we have a young man who wants nothing more than to play a sport. He knows there is a risk, but I have to admire him. What if he died playing basketball?? Well, it'd be tragic. On the other hand, he died doing something fun.

As I get older, and close enough to start watching all the relatives croak from cancer, heart disease, depression, neglect.....

there are very much worse ways to go than dying young doing something you enjoy.

Perhaps so, but then some neice from Des Moines that nobody has ever heard of will file a wrongful death claim against the University, seeking a few million for their negligence in allowing him to do something they knew to be risky. I operate health facilities where death is expected, predicted and, unfortunately, a common experience.... Trust me, the liability from family left behind is enormous and they are not bashful to make claims. Even if E-Man signed a waiver saying, "I realize the enormous risk I am taking and choose to accept the consequence, etc...." that niece will make her appearance looking for the loot.

The university is simply reacting to the sad world we live in and the "jackpot justice" system of tort law we allow to continue.

bebecerveza writes:

in response to TennesseeTuxedo:

Enough with the Tyler Smith updates. He thought so much of his team mates that he got arrested and kicked off of the team and out of school. Enough. Focus on the kids who left this school with some positives instead.

Only a small few know what really happend with that, Lets just say there was a reason why he carried those guns and it wasn't just to be a thug. Tyler needed to leave K-Town for certain reasons, easy way out.

Volunatic writes:

in response to keepitreal4vols:

Couldn't think of a better way to spend my Tuesday nights with my children watching players die on the Basketball floor. It will be just like the horse races, run the ambulance out there, load him up and finish the game like nothing happened. We got 12 deep on the bench, so what if we lose 1. Maybe Vegas will put out odds on how many games before his heart explodes and then we can all get rich off his death. But hey, at least we will be on Sportscenter that night...
Geeez, what is wrong with you?

Brutal, but I completely understand (and agree with) your point of view.
I realize Negedu loves playing basketball, but the college game is too intense for someone in his condition-- the risk of another cardiac "event" is way too high.
Someone else might "love" playing in traffic, but that doesn't mean they aren't stupid to do it.

VolunteerLifer writes:

My guess is that UT and UI are not afraid of E-man actually dying on the court. Neither are the doctors who cleared him. The reason is simply and only the prescence of his ICD. That machine will save his life if he experiences another dangerous arrythmic event. That machine means that he is no more in danger of losing his life than anyone else out there on the court.

But the prescence of the ICD also means there is a very real possibility that he will get shocked while on the court. That is what the schools want to avoid - the negative publicicity that will inevitably come to their program with audio and video of one of their players taking a series of shocks to his heart in front of a crowd of horrified onlookers. The shocks are extremely violent, the reaction of the recipient can be grotesque to say the least.

Doctors who have 'cleared' him to play are doing so only because they know he wears an ICD and therefore can't get killed or do further damage to his heart. Although they may be clearing him to play ball, they are not declaring that he has a healthy heart, With a diagnosis of cardiomyopathy, he will - barring some miracle - never again have a healthy heart.

orangeman1 writes:

in response to bigorangekoolaid:

(This comment was removed by the site staff.)

I think he will play college ball and he will be ok. My opinion could be just as right as anyone else's. Noone knows if he will have another cardiac emergency. I dont think it has to do with liability as much as negative PR if something did happen. He has been cleared now by several Dr's including Indiana's who surely arent quacks as some posters made it out in another thread about the other Dr's that cleared him. This comes down to PR and alot of universities wont take the risk, but I do believe he will play somewhere and he is a grown man and thinks he can play. He has Dr's that agree and its funny how some posters on here make it out like they know more about whats best for him. If it were my son and he was 21, I wouldnt want him to take the risk, but there are alot of other professions I wouldnt want him to take the risk in either(military, police, fire, convenient store clerk, oil rig worker, etc). Bottom line is he is 21 and can make his own decisions on whats best for him. The universities make their decision on whats best for them. Could he be wrong> maybe Could he be right? Maybe, but none of us know for sure, just offering opinions.

osbymartin#581730 writes:

in response to civilianvol_formerly_marinevol:

Did anyone from KNS happen to ask the UT administration why they won't let him play when he has been cleared by his doctors? Must be some reason other than his health.

Well apparently it isn't just the UT administration. IU admin wouldn't clear him either. I am not sure that he will find a major college that will be willing to take on the risk with the liability potential.

VolunteerLifer writes:

in response to orangeman1:

I think he will play college ball and he will be ok. My opinion could be just as right as anyone else's. Noone knows if he will have another cardiac emergency. I dont think it has to do with liability as much as negative PR if something did happen. He has been cleared now by several Dr's including Indiana's who surely arent quacks as some posters made it out in another thread about the other Dr's that cleared him. This comes down to PR and alot of universities wont take the risk, but I do believe he will play somewhere and he is a grown man and thinks he can play. He has Dr's that agree and its funny how some posters on here make it out like they know more about whats best for him. If it were my son and he was 21, I wouldnt want him to take the risk, but there are alot of other professions I wouldnt want him to take the risk in either(military, police, fire, convenient store clerk, oil rig worker, etc). Bottom line is he is 21 and can make his own decisions on whats best for him. The universities make their decision on whats best for them. Could he be wrong> maybe Could he be right? Maybe, but none of us know for sure, just offering opinions.

"No one knows if he will have another cardiac emergency."

Wrong. With his diagnosis and history, we know that he PROBABLY WILL have other cardiac incidents that will be significant enough to cause his ICD to fire. It might not happen for years. Or it might happen today. But, given his youthful age and history, and the probability of progressivity of his condition, it is probably inevitable that he will experience ICD shocks at some point in the future.

us43137415#376444 writes:

I gotta give the kid guts. I admire his decision to really want to play.

I would also have to give any school that permits him to play, guts too.

There is no doubt... NO DOUBT, PEOPLE.. that if he suffered a heart attack on the court and passed away, that his family would not file a super-sized lawsuit against the school, for KNOWING he had a heart problem, yet cleared him to play anyway.

Pretty soon, he's going to give up the fight to play basketball. I will be sad, and I will get over it. If he passed away playing, I would be even sadder, but will not get over the fact that a school somewhere took a bad chance.

orangeman1 writes:

in response to VolunteerLifer:

"No one knows if he will have another cardiac emergency."

Wrong. With his diagnosis and history, we know that he PROBABLY WILL have other cardiac incidents that will be significant enough to cause his ICD to fire. It might not happen for years. Or it might happen today. But, given his youthful age and history, and the probability of progressivity of his condition, it is probably inevitable that he will experience ICD shocks at some point in the future.

You call me wrong then contradict yourself. Funny. I say noone knows and your whole argument is based on something I'm pretty sure you dont specialize in or have done any research in probablility and odds of it reoccurring. You follow it up with PROBABLY WILL. Then you follow that up with "probably inevitable" Is that like definately maybe? Your whole argument against me is actually supporting what I said. You dont know for sure and neither do I, but several Dr's have cleared him physically to play that know more than me or you.

wayoutwill writes:

in response to always_vol:

I'm going to play devil's advocate here....
so many young people lose their lives in TOTALLY senseless ways:
-car accidents
-disease
-suicide
-murder
and, saddest of all,
war.

Here, we have a young man who wants nothing more than to play a sport. He knows there is a risk, but I have to admire him. What if he died playing basketball?? Well, it'd be tragic. On the other hand, he died doing something fun.

As I get older, and close enough to start watching all the relatives croak from cancer, heart disease, depression, neglect.....

there are very much worse ways to go than dying young doing something you enjoy.

The Volunteer program is making a big mistake by denying him the opportunity to play basketball here in K-Town!There would be no liability issues,ever hear of a hold harmless contract?The young man wants to play,he should get to play.The doctors clear him to play,end of discussion.We all know what the real deal is with Negs;it's called no more room at the inn!I hope he can find a place to play,I'm just glad to be a fan of a program that puts winning above all else,no matter the right or wrong of it,and that's why we will win because of our "just win baby" policy!Go Vols!

osbymartin#581730 writes:

in response to wayoutwill:

The Volunteer program is making a big mistake by denying him the opportunity to play basketball here in K-Town!There would be no liability issues,ever hear of a hold harmless contract?The young man wants to play,he should get to play.The doctors clear him to play,end of discussion.We all know what the real deal is with Negs;it's called no more room at the inn!I hope he can find a place to play,I'm just glad to be a fan of a program that puts winning above all else,no matter the right or wrong of it,and that's why we will win because of our "just win baby" policy!Go Vols!

What exactly do you mean by no more room at the inn?

VolunteerLifer writes:

in response to orangeman1:

You call me wrong then contradict yourself. Funny. I say noone knows and your whole argument is based on something I'm pretty sure you dont specialize in or have done any research in probablility and odds of it reoccurring. You follow it up with PROBABLY WILL. Then you follow that up with "probably inevitable" Is that like definately maybe? Your whole argument against me is actually supporting what I said. You dont know for sure and neither do I, but several Dr's have cleared him physically to play that know more than me or you.

Take it easy orangeman. I'm not arguing against you. I'm not arguing at all.

There really is no argument. Check with any cardiologist you like. Someone who is diagnosed with cardiomyopathy (enlarged heart, heart failure, congestive heart failure) has an almost zero chance of recovery to a fully healthy heart. While some statistically rare circumstances of recovery are on record, the odds against it are overwhelming. Once the heart muscle is stretched past the point of deformity, and it remains there for significant time, it will not go back to normal elasticity and size. and the deformation of the muscle is what has caused damage to his electrical system. Since the muscle will not go back to its original elasticity and size, the electrical system in the heart will continue to be damaged and will always be a threat to go into the kind of cardiac arrest that felled Emmanuel once before. Given how young he is, and given that this is a permanent condition, and given that the condition may actually progress and get worse, the odds that his heart will someday go into a rythm that will cause the ICD to fire - interrupting a potential cardiac arrest - are overwhelming. Do the research yourself. Ask any cardiologist you want.

murrayvol writes:

in response to pdhuff#552644:

Sad situation for the young man.

Maybe Memphis is the answer.

Memories of Hank Gathers will never go away.

bknisle1 writes:

in response to TennesseeTuxedo:

Enough with the Tyler Smith updates. He thought so much of his team mates that he got arrested and kicked off of the team and out of school. Enough. Focus on the kids who left this school with some positives instead.

Whoa, chill out bro. Tyler Smith made one mistake that couldn't be pushed under the rug. Unluckily for him, being a collegiate athlete in this day and age that is all it takes. There are many UT players that left with "some positives" that had just as many, if not more negatives that probably just got forgotten about, whether by authorities or fans. I've heard from people who have worked with the team that Smith is actually a really good guy, even more so than others on the team. So before you go off ripping on this guy, think about how many mistakes you've made. "Let him who is without sin among you be the first to throw a stone" That's Biblical son!!

Plus, its not like he was the headline of the article. Oh and maybe you should ask his teammates what they think about him and his actions. Pretty sure three of them were in the car with him and just didn't do something that is a federal crime. They all still support him and there is no ill will towards him. Take a chill pill bro.

always_vol (Inactive) writes:

in response to bigorangekoolaid:

(This comment was removed by the site staff.)

in your case, that is whenever you open your mouth.

always_vol (Inactive) writes:

in response to tennrich1:

One question...."saddest of all-war".....
Man you need to come work the midnight shift in the neighborhood I work and ask the young man killed by murder if its as sad as someone getting killed in war...

I seriously thought about that....but war is typically fought for bullcrap reasons such as religion, rich people's money, or plain insanity.

Still, I agree with your point, it's a pretty thin line between the two.

always_vol (Inactive) writes:

in response to keepitreal4vols:

Couldn't think of a better way to spend my Tuesday nights with my children watching players die on the Basketball floor. It will be just like the horse races, run the ambulance out there, load him up and finish the game like nothing happened. We got 12 deep on the bench, so what if we lose 1. Maybe Vegas will put out odds on how many games before his heart explodes and then we can all get rich off his death. But hey, at least we will be on Sportscenter that night...
Geeez, what is wrong with you?

So, ace, you never watch football?? In college and in the pros, the collisions are severe enough on ANY given play to kill a man. No, I bet you are gluded right to the TV set. You where probably one of the dudes all giddy when Tebow got whammed at UK.

What's wrong with me?? Well, I actually THINK for a living. My livelihood and my family's well-being actually are tied to my ability to analyze situations.

You??

So, take your sarcasm and blow it. My post and standpoint are simply this: there are worse ways to live your life, and worse ways to die if it happens. You don't agree?? Fine. But, you can't seem to respond with any appropriate civility....
what does that say about you??

always_vol (Inactive) writes:

in response to wayoutwill:

The Volunteer program is making a big mistake by denying him the opportunity to play basketball here in K-Town!There would be no liability issues,ever hear of a hold harmless contract?The young man wants to play,he should get to play.The doctors clear him to play,end of discussion.We all know what the real deal is with Negs;it's called no more room at the inn!I hope he can find a place to play,I'm just glad to be a fan of a program that puts winning above all else,no matter the right or wrong of it,and that's why we will win because of our "just win baby" policy!Go Vols!

I honestly don't know if the program is making a mistake of not.

whether E-man would ever have been good enough to really help out the program is debatable to me.

I'm more concerned with the kid and IF he is capable of doing what he wants to do within "reasonable" risk tolerances.

always_vol (Inactive) writes:

in response to bigorangekoolaid:

(This comment was removed by the site staff.)

I swear to god you are the most classless fool on this chat board. Period.

always_vol (Inactive) writes:

in response to rclarkvols#224537:

One question. Would you let him play if he were your son?

One question: would you send your kid off to war??

always_vol (Inactive) writes:

For those of you who responded with civil discourse on a difficult and controversial subject, thanks.

For those who did not, maybe learn to express opinions in an educated way. Your credibility is pretty much shot if you do not.

There will always be two sides to this argument:
1) the man is of age, and should be allowed to make decisions for himself. These decisions might be limited to what a 'reasonable' person would do, as determined by a jury of HIS peers.
2) no way in hell. He's a walking liability case, shouldn't even be hired to work at McDonald's because he could die on the job. In fact, he's really not competent to run his own life, and we need to protect him from himself. He obviously lacks for coherent judgment in that only an insane person would risk his life to play a sport.

osbymartin#581730 writes:

in response to always_vol:

One question: would you send your kid off to war??

Come on man...you can't be honestly comparing serving your country with playing a game. The choice with both would be up to the individuals and in both cases it doesn't matter because the university nor the military would take him under these circumstances so both questions are actually moot points..

nola_vol writes:

No one here seems to be remembering the internal context for Emmanuel's thinking on this matter.

Remember these quotes from previous stories?

"Negedu's decision is one of need; he's determined to support his family back in Nigeria, and he feels basketball is his best route."
-------------
"Pearl said Negedu's greatest fears were not for his own safety but the well-being of his family in Nigeria.
'When I got to the hospital and saw Emmanuel, his No. 1 concern and the first thing out of his mouth was about his family,' Pearl said. 'He said his family could not afford to lose him. His family was counting on him to come to this country to get his degree and play basketball.'
He has said in prior interviews that he comes from a poor financial background in Kaduna, Nigeria."
------------
"Nigerian-born American basketball player, Emmanuel Negedu, is back in Nigeria to mourn the death of his sister, Amy Negedu who passed on at the age of 14." [January, 2010]

As a Christian young man who's faith is strong, I'm sure he's confident God got him here and plans to use him to take care of his family. It only makes sense that he would make sure God has truly closed the door to using his (God-given) athletic abilities to accomplish that. Although Emmanuel does not possess our inbred American assumption that life offers many paths to success, he is nevertheless too smart and too well counseled to ignore the possibility that God can also guide him to that goal through another door.

What Emmanuel is looking for is clarification, because once he commits to a course of action... he knows he will be committed 100%.

TennesseeTuxedo writes:

in response to Biggunzz44:

(This comment was removed by the site staff.)

Just another enabling fool standing up for thuggish behavior.

TennesseeTuxedo writes:

in response to bebecerveza:

Only a small few know what really happend with that, Lets just say there was a reason why he carried those guns and it wasn't just to be a thug. Tyler needed to leave K-Town for certain reasons, easy way out.

A lot more people know that he was being threatened, than you realize, so stop with the I know it all mentality. That still is no reason for anyone to carry guns illegally in a car and for one to be an illegal gun.

VolInSabanLand writes:

in response to wayoutwill:

The Volunteer program is making a big mistake by denying him the opportunity to play basketball here in K-Town!There would be no liability issues,ever hear of a hold harmless contract?The young man wants to play,he should get to play.The doctors clear him to play,end of discussion.We all know what the real deal is with Negs;it's called no more room at the inn!I hope he can find a place to play,I'm just glad to be a fan of a program that puts winning above all else,no matter the right or wrong of it,and that's why we will win because of our "just win baby" policy!Go Vols!

I have certainly heard of "hold harmless agreements." I've seen hundreds, read hundreds and written dozens. Sadly, as clearly as most of these make it that one party is willing to accept the outcome of their decisions, and as clearly as it may be that these waive liability...they are often totally ignored by courts and juries. It is amazing to me, having been trained to understand that the law is a rather logical and sensible set of rules, but courts and juries do extremely weird things when emotions get involved. Health care cases - especially those where the "injured" are very sympathetic, (the young, little old grannies, etc...), and the party accused of negligence is perceived to be big and rich, (doctors, medical institutions, insurance companies and universities), are the most likely to have these plain language agreements discounted in favor of the juries sympathies.

I hope I'm wrong, but i still believe the fear of liability is a major portion of this decision...along with the fear of PR, (as many of you have pointed out), should an event take place.

always_vol (Inactive) writes:

in response to VolInSabanLand:

I have certainly heard of "hold harmless agreements." I've seen hundreds, read hundreds and written dozens. Sadly, as clearly as most of these make it that one party is willing to accept the outcome of their decisions, and as clearly as it may be that these waive liability...they are often totally ignored by courts and juries. It is amazing to me, having been trained to understand that the law is a rather logical and sensible set of rules, but courts and juries do extremely weird things when emotions get involved. Health care cases - especially those where the "injured" are very sympathetic, (the young, little old grannies, etc...), and the party accused of negligence is perceived to be big and rich, (doctors, medical institutions, insurance companies and universities), are the most likely to have these plain language agreements discounted in favor of the juries sympathies.

I hope I'm wrong, but i still believe the fear of liability is a major portion of this decision...along with the fear of PR, (as many of you have pointed out), should an event take place.

Great post.

always_vol (Inactive) writes:

in response to osbymartin#581730:

Come on man...you can't be honestly comparing serving your country with playing a game. The choice with both would be up to the individuals and in both cases it doesn't matter because the university nor the military would take him under these circumstances so both questions are actually moot points..

The purpose of the original question 'would you let you son play' was to ask if it was my son, would I put him in harm ways. My response, was in kind, would you put your son (or daughter) in harm's way by sending them to war. Especially relevant in terms of many, many wars are fought for questionable motives at best, and ones for which you may vehemently agree.

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