'Mobile drug dealer' charged in death of former Vol Aaron Douglas

Rodney Odum has been arrested in death of ex-Vol Aaron Douglas.

Photo by Fernandina Beach Police Department

Rodney Odum has been arrested in death of ex-Vol Aaron Douglas.

Aaron Douglas, photographed in the News Sentinel studio in 2008. The former Maryville High School and University of Tennessee football standout was found dead on Wednesday, May 11, 2011, at Fernandina Beach, Fla. He was 21.

Aaron Douglas, photographed in the News Sentinel studio in 2008. The former Maryville High School and University of Tennessee football standout was found dead on Wednesday, May 11, 2011, at Fernandina Beach, Fla. He was 21.

Archived video: Lane Kiffin praises RT Aaron Douglas

Aaron Douglas didn’t have the controlled substance that would ultimately cause his death when he called for a taxi cab late May 11, according to police..

En route to the house where his body would eventually be discovered hours later, the former Maryville High School and University of Tennessee football standout bought two Methadone pills from his driver, 50-year-old Rodney Young Odum, who had a reputation as a “mobile drug dealer,” according to police.

Odum was arrested late Monday and charged with manslaughter and sale/delivery of a controlled substance, Fernandina Beach (Fla.) Police Chief James T. Hurley announced Tuesday. Odum is currently being held on $50,000 bond at the Nassau County Jail.

“The combined opinions of police detectives, the State Attorney’s Office, and the Douglas family were considered in determining that Manslaughter was the most appropriate charge in this case,” Hurley wrote. “The victim clearly shares some responsibility for the reckless behavior that took his life. However, Mr. Odum reportedly had a reputation as a mobile drug dealer, making it very easy for the victim to locate and ingest the drugs that killed him.”

The 21-year-old Douglas, who had transferred to Alabama for the 2011 season, had more than just Methadone in his system when he was found dead early May 12 on the second-floor balcony at 2570 First Avenue in a Fernandina Beach house. A medical examiner’s toxicology report revealed trace amounts of Diazepam — also known as Valium — Carisoprodol — a type of muscle relaxant — Meprobamate, Nordiazepam, Oxycodone and Cannabinoids.

The Methadone pills, alone, were “sufficient enough to cause death,” Hurley wrote. Without it, Douglas would have likely survived, as Hurley wrote “no other combination would have likely caused death.”

“Although it is often difficult to pursue criminal charges in cases involving drug overdoses, this case provides us the ability to send a clear message that we intend to prosecute those that openly dispense dangerous drugs in our community whenever possible,” Hurley wrote.

Odum’s arrest is the fifth in relation to Douglas’ death. On June 21, the four residents of the house — Daniel Stouter, 24, Dana Luberto, 23, Neal Clements 22, and Nathaniel Flanders 21 — were charged with allowing an open house party “wherein at least 16 persons under the age of 21 were allowed to consume alcohol and/or narcotics.

Following a dinner in Jacksonville, Douglas was last seen alive at 2 a.m. early May 12. He was found dead a little more than six hours later.

Douglas, a former freshman All-America offensive tackle with the Vols in 2009, transferred from UT after the coaching change from Lane Kiffin to Derek Dooley before his sophomore season. He played one season at Arizona Western College before signing with Alabama at the end of 2010.

The son of a former UT football star, David, and a former Lady Vols basketball player, Karla, Douglas was charged with driving under the influence last Christmas Eve in Maryville. He was punished internally by Alabama coach Nick Saban, but responded with a strong spring and was in line for playing time at left tackle.

Andrew Gribble may be reached at 865-342-6327. Follow him at http://twitter.com/Andrew_Gribble and http://blogs.knoxnews.com/gribble

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Comments » 95

Witch_Doctors writes:

Witch Doctor say maybe punish this clown for selling the stuff but Witch Doctor say the ULTIMATE responsibility lies with the young man making the bad decisions. Witch Doctor say sometimes really bad choices can lead to your death, this just a huge tragedy for his family.
Bones never lie.

jcthevol writes:

Here we go again. Prayers for the Douglass family.

chattavfl86 writes:

Its awful that the family is still having to go through this.

GONAVY writes:

in response to Witch_Doctors:

Witch Doctor say maybe punish this clown for selling the stuff but Witch Doctor say the ULTIMATE responsibility lies with the young man making the bad decisions. Witch Doctor say sometimes really bad choices can lead to your death, this just a huge tragedy for his family.
Bones never lie.

Well said...

Witch_Doctors writes:

in response to RockyTopRenegade:

(This comment was removed by the site staff.)

Witch Doctor agree...some things dont need our input.
RIP
Bones never lie.

dvhill100 writes:

It sounds like they are going to make an example out of this guy. I would not want to be in his shoes if they drop the hammer like they want to.

bmgvirgo#210233 writes:

Good for the police in FL. I am amazed some low life drug dealer is actually getting charged. If it happened more often they might not be quite as willing to deal drugs. Drug Dealers are LOSERS!

eprahm (Inactive) writes:

in response to Witch_Doctors:

Witch Doctor say maybe punish this clown for selling the stuff but Witch Doctor say the ULTIMATE responsibility lies with the young man making the bad decisions. Witch Doctor say sometimes really bad choices can lead to your death, this just a huge tragedy for his family.
Bones never lie.

Very well said.

TennVol01 writes:

in response to chattavfl86:

Its awful that the family is still having to go through this.

It is "awful" that Aaron made the wrong choice to do drugs and devastate his family. He personally put that poison in his system, despite all the public warnings throughout his life. There would be no "dealers" without "users".

MO_Orange writes:

Next time there's a fatal drunk driving accident let's arrest the liquor store owner and clerk or the grocery store owner or checkout person or the bartender or friend that provided the alcohol. But whatever we do, we shouldn't blame the person who voluntarily drank. This is the New Era of "no personal responsibility." Everything in life is somebody else's fault.

b4allkids writes:

in response to MO_Orange:

Next time there's a fatal drunk driving accident let's arrest the liquor store owner and clerk or the grocery store owner or checkout person or the bartender or friend that provided the alcohol. But whatever we do, we shouldn't blame the person who voluntarily drank. This is the New Era of "no personal responsibility." Everything in life is somebody else's fault.

I strongly agree about the importance of personal responsibility. However, this does NOT mean that 100% of the responsibility lies with one person. Seldom is anything that simple, and using personal responsibility (a good thing) as an excuse to deny that we all share some responsibility for others (also a good thing) is a problem. Responsibility is not a zero-sum game.

Vol_in_GA writes:

in response to Witch_Doctors:

Witch Doctor say maybe punish this clown for selling the stuff but Witch Doctor say the ULTIMATE responsibility lies with the young man making the bad decisions. Witch Doctor say sometimes really bad choices can lead to your death, this just a huge tragedy for his family.
Bones never lie.

+1

orangeman1 writes:

in response to chattavfl86:

Its awful that the family is still having to go through this.

It sounds like the Douglas family wanted this guy prosecuted for Manslaughter according to the article. I would think they would want to put it behind them too, but they feel someone should be charged with Manslaughter. I have mixed feelings about it. The guy should be charged with selling drugs. Maybe reckless endangerment, but I dont see the leap to manslaughter. A Douglas was taking a risk and he knew it. The low life cabby surely had no intent to kill him.

CarlChilders writes:

in response to b4allkids:

I strongly agree about the importance of personal responsibility. However, this does NOT mean that 100% of the responsibility lies with one person. Seldom is anything that simple, and using personal responsibility (a good thing) as an excuse to deny that we all share some responsibility for others (also a good thing) is a problem. Responsibility is not a zero-sum game.

Wouldn't that make gun dealers accomplices to murder?

KCHS63 writes:

in response to MO_Orange:

Next time there's a fatal drunk driving accident let's arrest the liquor store owner and clerk or the grocery store owner or checkout person or the bartender or friend that provided the alcohol. But whatever we do, we shouldn't blame the person who voluntarily drank. This is the New Era of "no personal responsibility." Everything in life is somebody else's fault.

There is more than one responsibility. I work part time in a bar in Atlanta. All our bartenders agree with the decision made several years ago to charge a bartender with manslaughter who severely overserved an individual who then drove the wrong way up I-75 killing an entire family of four. It wasn't, but it could have been a family from Tennessee! When someone starts drinking, they begin to lose their usual good judgment. They need the guidance of a professional who can see what's happening to them. We're all in this together. Yes, the user/drinker has a responsibility, but you want to depend on the judgment of someone who's drunk or addicted? I don't think so........

Digital5000 writes:

in response to CarlChilders:

Wouldn't that make gun dealers accomplices to murder?

It is not illegal to buy a gun, or to sell one. Drugs are a different story. Now we're just splitting hairs and speaking law lingo.

On that note, I’m done. RIP Mr. Douglas

-Enjoy Yoselves

brokendownoldvol writes:

Why don't they start prosecuting the doctors who give this stuff out like candy to people on medicaid who just turn around and sell it?

Witch_Doctors writes:

in response to CantStandSaban:

(This comment was removed by the site staff.)

Witch Doctor throw up a little in mouth.
Bones never lie.

Biggie writes:

in response to MO_Orange:

Next time there's a fatal drunk driving accident let's arrest the liquor store owner and clerk or the grocery store owner or checkout person or the bartender or friend that provided the alcohol. But whatever we do, we shouldn't blame the person who voluntarily drank. This is the New Era of "no personal responsibility." Everything in life is somebody else's fault.

Good post. We need more personal responsibility.

Biggie writes:

in response to KCHS63:

There is more than one responsibility. I work part time in a bar in Atlanta. All our bartenders agree with the decision made several years ago to charge a bartender with manslaughter who severely overserved an individual who then drove the wrong way up I-75 killing an entire family of four. It wasn't, but it could have been a family from Tennessee! When someone starts drinking, they begin to lose their usual good judgment. They need the guidance of a professional who can see what's happening to them. We're all in this together. Yes, the user/drinker has a responsibility, but you want to depend on the judgment of someone who's drunk or addicted? I don't think so........

I don't want to depend on a bartender to make any decisions for me either. Do you really consider yourself a professional?

westknoxrepub writes:

Wait until the Cult of Katie gets a hold of this one. . .

Rubyred writes:

Why is this cab driver responsible for the death of this college football player yet the adults who gave Henry Grandju drugs are not responsible for his death when they also provided him with Methadone?

b4allkids writes:

in response to CarlChilders:

Wouldn't that make gun dealers accomplices to murder?

That would depend on the circumstances. There's no simple formula that can be applied to every situation. Each case needs to be considered thoughtfully and in relation to sound principles.

I'm sure the cabbie didn't intend for this young man to die--and the young man surely didn't intend to die. More than one person made a bad decision (and engaged in illegal activity) in this whole scenario.

The bottom line is that a young life was lost. What remains is much sadness by many--and if we're lucky, maybe some will have learned a lesson or two (though at a high cost).

FearlessFreep writes:

Personal responsibility is just that - personal. Sadly, no one made him take the pills even though he obviously had access to them. It's hard to accept that somehow a loved one made such a bad choice that it cost them their life. The natural reaction is to blame someone else.

As others have said, prosecute this guy for selling illegal prescription meds, but he didn't kill Aaron Douglas. Only Aaron is ultimately responsible.
I suspect the Douglas' know that but want to at least use this opportunity to remove this guy from the streets so it doesn't happen to someone else.
The problem is you can't protect someone from them self. That never works.
Hopefully they'll eventually find peace from a horrible situation.

DLuckySeven writes:

in response to Digital5000:

It is not illegal to buy a gun, or to sell one. Drugs are a different story. Now we're just splitting hairs and speaking law lingo.

On that note, I’m done. RIP Mr. Douglas

-Enjoy Yoselves

There are alot of instances where it is illegal to sell or own a gun. so dont tell this bs about it is not illegal to buy or sell a gun. Mr Douglas was not from the state of FL. I dont believe he could have bought a gun from the taxi driver legally. Just what I think I alos dont believe Mr. Douglas could have went to a gun dealer and bought a gun immediately, there is a waiting period. So it would have been illegal in this case.

HooRay_Vol writes:

"The Medical Examiner’s toxicology report revealed trace amounts of Carisoprodol, Diazepam, Meprobamate, Nordiazepam, Oxycodone, and Cannabinoids."

This is know as POLYSUBSTANCE abuse/dependence. And is seems that it is affecting more and more young people. What ever happened to the "just say no" campaign?

Sailer writes:

in response to CarlChilders:

Wouldn't that make gun dealers accomplices to murder?

Maybe car dealers or even roulette dealers.

MoJoe (Inactive) writes:

in response to Biggie:

I don't want to depend on a bartender to make any decisions for me either. Do you really consider yourself a professional?

Every time you walk into a restaurant that serves alcohol or bar a bartender is making a decision for you

finn writes:

Per the ME report, AD was a walking pharmacy. The net result is very sad but he was heading for trouble any way you looked at it. I have no doubt the cab driver is a scum bag but do have issue with the manslaughter charge. Strictly from a practical standpoint, no good business man wants to kill his customers even when you deal in sleaze. Again, a very sad outcome but a lot of folks leading up to this point and no one more than AD bears responsibility for how the story ended.

A_Voice_ofReason writes:

Thats the problem with this country, always wanting to place blame on someone other than the person responsible. This is a TERRIBLE tragedy and very-very sad, but the cab driver is NOT responsible for killing AD any more than a gun salesman is responsible for someone who commits suicide with a gun.

Very sad situation, I hope the family is healing from this senseless death.

sly_stone99#434111 writes:

in response to bmgvirgo#210233:

Good for the police in FL. I am amazed some low life drug dealer is actually getting charged. If it happened more often they might not be quite as willing to deal drugs. Drug Dealers are LOSERS!

He will make a deal with the DA and squeel on those up the food chain which is who the DA really wants.

Saucy815 writes:

in response to MO_Orange:

Next time there's a fatal drunk driving accident let's arrest the liquor store owner and clerk or the grocery store owner or checkout person or the bartender or friend that provided the alcohol. But whatever we do, we shouldn't blame the person who voluntarily drank. This is the New Era of "no personal responsibility." Everything in life is somebody else's fault.

Selling alcohol isn't illegal. Selling meth is.

GetEmVols writes:

Aaron Douglas killed Aaron Douglas. This guy should be arrested for selling drugs, not manslaughter.. silly.

keviningeorgia writes:

Everybody loses here. Everybody.

They may charge the guy with manslaughter but that wont stick (and should not stick) in Fla. Reckless endangerment along with the obvious possession, distribution and all the other things that fit (including not paying incoome tax on the profits).

There's plenty of charges that do apply. Since the guy is no angel, he will serve some time for this, too. And he should.

I'm so very sorry for the Douglass family's loss. May God comfort them...

boroviathaochvolsfan writes:

This is bull...I do not condone drug dealing as he should be punished for that but manslaughter come on...this Aaron Douglass' fault plain & simple. How could the cab driver had know what else he ingested that night. If it were just methadone in his system it would not have killed him either. They will never get a conviction on manslaughter. Completely absurd and a waste of tax payers money. Again let me stress before the know it alls and holier than thoughs bash me...convict the guy of dealing drugs since that is what he is guilty of.

boroviathaochvolsfan writes:

in response to Saucy815:

Selling alcohol isn't illegal. Selling meth is.

Yep your right selling methadone is illegal which is different from meth btw so convict him of dealing drugs not manslaughter. Although it does not matter because no jury would ever convict him of manslaughter in a case like this. Hell just look at Casey Anthony she even didnt get convicted of manslaughter!

us43137415#376444 writes:

in response to Witch_Doctors:

Witch Doctor say maybe punish this clown for selling the stuff but Witch Doctor say the ULTIMATE responsibility lies with the young man making the bad decisions. Witch Doctor say sometimes really bad choices can lead to your death, this just a huge tragedy for his family.
Bones never lie.

People say witch doctor need to quit talking about himself in third person, act like grownup, and give opinion in first person like normal person.

People say witch doctor opinion be more believable if witch doctor act like adult, and not child in playground.

People say, witch doctor opinion have more credibility if witch doctor use computer keyboard like responsible adult.

People say, correct behavior result in correct response.

Unfortunately, People say, witch doctor will continue to act like child, because he know no better.

People say, witch doctor response to this post, will prove point.

rockytopjc22#1360044 writes:

in response to KCHS63:

There is more than one responsibility. I work part time in a bar in Atlanta. All our bartenders agree with the decision made several years ago to charge a bartender with manslaughter who severely overserved an individual who then drove the wrong way up I-75 killing an entire family of four. It wasn't, but it could have been a family from Tennessee! When someone starts drinking, they begin to lose their usual good judgment. They need the guidance of a professional who can see what's happening to them. We're all in this together. Yes, the user/drinker has a responsibility, but you want to depend on the judgment of someone who's drunk or addicted? I don't think so........

ok so what your saying is we need to hold drug dealers to higher standard? Come on he is a drug dealer do you think he cares how bombed AD was? I dont think so.....

Saucy815 writes:

in response to boroviathaochvolsfan:

Yep your right selling methadone is illegal which is different from meth btw so convict him of dealing drugs not manslaughter. Although it does not matter because no jury would ever convict him of manslaughter in a case like this. Hell just look at Casey Anthony she even didnt get convicted of manslaughter!

You may have a point. Except that the law states that if you provide drugs illegally and those drugs kill someone then you are guilty of murder.

Is the law fair? Personally, I'm not sure. But the fact is that it's on the books and should be enforced. It's not like the DA just said "hey let's shoot for manslaughter." They said "he broke X law and therefore is guilty of X"

Some people might think you can go to dinner and have a glass of wine and be okay to drive home. But unfortunately in a zero tolerance state you WILL be arrested for drunk driving. Is that fair? Maybe not. But it's the law and has to be followed.

If you don't agree with the rules that's another issue. but we can't have police and DAs just picking and choosing which laws they deem important enough to enforce and/or prosecute.

A_Voice_ofReason writes:

in response to Saucy815:

Selling alcohol isn't illegal. Selling meth is.

What a stupid post.

Taking meth is illegal too, and that's what AD did and he paid for it with his life.

Look, there is no one to blame besides AD. Again, this is a very sad situation, but nobody is to blame here accept AD. As someone said earlier, no one wins here.

Footvol2010 writes:

in response to Saucy815:

You may have a point. Except that the law states that if you provide drugs illegally and those drugs kill someone then you are guilty of murder.

Is the law fair? Personally, I'm not sure. But the fact is that it's on the books and should be enforced. It's not like the DA just said "hey let's shoot for manslaughter." They said "he broke X law and therefore is guilty of X"

Some people might think you can go to dinner and have a glass of wine and be okay to drive home. But unfortunately in a zero tolerance state you WILL be arrested for drunk driving. Is that fair? Maybe not. But it's the law and has to be followed.

If you don't agree with the rules that's another issue. but we can't have police and DAs just picking and choosing which laws they deem important enough to enforce and/or prosecute.

There's laws on the books in Knoxville that every business has to have a hitching post. I don't see that enforced very often.

Perhaps things would be better if DAs (not police) did pick and choose more which laws were important enough to enforce and/or prosecute.

Saucy815 writes:

in response to A_Voice_ofReason:

What a stupid post.

Taking meth is illegal too, and that's what AD did and he paid for it with his life.

Look, there is no one to blame besides AD. Again, this is a very sad situation, but nobody is to blame here accept AD. As someone said earlier, no one wins here.

Thank you Captain Obvious.
I was replying to a post about the sale of alcohol and comparing the SALE of drugs.

And law enforcement picking and choosing laws is a dangerous path to go down. Before you know it they'll start picking and choosing whether people are worthy enough to be called victims based on their lifestyle or income. Oh...wait....

tuscavol writes:

I have yet to hear anyone say Aaron Douglas was NOT responsible for his own death. He sought the man out and purchased the drugs on his own and unfortunately paid for that decision with his life. I don't,however, agree with any that feels the dealer bears no part of the blame in this tragedy. If THIS dealer is not responsible, then none of them are and we should stop wasting millions of tax dollars trying to catch, convict, house and feed them every year. Lets change the laws and let them openly sell their death wherever they like. Do you really want to live in a society like that? I hope not.

Here is my point: THE DEALER WAS SELLING A CONTROLLED SUBSTANCE AND THEREIN LIES HIS CRIME. That is why he must be charged. This fact is not about shifting blame its about upholding the law. Anything you sell outside of legal boundaries that plays a roll in a persons death gives the state the right to prosecute you. This includes guns, alcohol, and even cheeseburgers.

Aaron Douglas is dead and that is the ultimate price he paid for a stupid decision.

Ayres_Hall writes:

Wait a minute. So Aaron Douglas called for (or hailed) a cab and it just so happens the cabbie is a drug dealer that picked him up and then offered and sold him the lethal drugs?

You mant me to believe this happend?

CCLC writes:

in response to Witch_Doctors:

Witch Doctor say maybe punish this clown for selling the stuff but Witch Doctor say the ULTIMATE responsibility lies with the young man making the bad decisions. Witch Doctor say sometimes really bad choices can lead to your death, this just a huge tragedy for his family.
Bones never lie.

That's tough love right there Doc. Ironic on the heels of the former Vol with the manslaughter and probation stat........
just sayin'

Footvol2010 writes:

in response to tuscavol:

I have yet to hear anyone say Aaron Douglas was NOT responsible for his own death. He sought the man out and purchased the drugs on his own and unfortunately paid for that decision with his life. I don't,however, agree with any that feels the dealer bears no part of the blame in this tragedy. If THIS dealer is not responsible, then none of them are and we should stop wasting millions of tax dollars trying to catch, convict, house and feed them every year. Lets change the laws and let them openly sell their death wherever they like. Do you really want to live in a society like that? I hope not.

Here is my point: THE DEALER WAS SELLING A CONTROLLED SUBSTANCE AND THEREIN LIES HIS CRIME. That is why he must be charged. This fact is not about shifting blame its about upholding the law. Anything you sell outside of legal boundaries that plays a roll in a persons death gives the state the right to prosecute you. This includes guns, alcohol, and even cheeseburgers.

Aaron Douglas is dead and that is the ultimate price he paid for a stupid decision.

"If THIS dealer is not responsible, then none of them are and we should stop wasting millions of tax dollars trying to catch, convict, house and feed them every year. Lets change the laws and let them openly sell their death wherever they like."

I think I'm experiencing deja vu...

Ah yes! Alcohol prohibition.

The truth is, when someone chooses to ingest a potentially dangerous substance (alcohol, opiates, whatever) it is one's own responsibility to ingest said substance responsibly. Aaron Douglas chose to combine opiates and valium, a known dangerous combination, and paid the price.

Also, funny how most seem to forget that Florida is currently having to completely revamp their opiate prescription laws because doctors down there were abusing the system getting tons of kickbacks from the pharm companies. Why isn't the doctor who prescribed the methadone/valium to someone who didn't need it (if he/she was able to sell it he/she didn't need it) being charged? So many double standards.

tuscavol writes:

in response to Ayres_Hall:

Wait a minute. So Aaron Douglas called for (or hailed) a cab and it just so happens the cabbie is a drug dealer that picked him up and then offered and sold him the lethal drugs?

You mant me to believe this happend?

No, this cabbie didn't just happen to be a drug dealer. I'm sure Aaron Douglas knew exactly what this man was even before he got into his cab. He was a known mobile dealer.

Surly your not suggesting this whole thing was fabricated? A conspiracy?

tuscavol writes:

in response to Footvol2010:

"If THIS dealer is not responsible, then none of them are and we should stop wasting millions of tax dollars trying to catch, convict, house and feed them every year. Lets change the laws and let them openly sell their death wherever they like."

I think I'm experiencing deja vu...

Ah yes! Alcohol prohibition.

The truth is, when someone chooses to ingest a potentially dangerous substance (alcohol, opiates, whatever) it is one's own responsibility to ingest said substance responsibly. Aaron Douglas chose to combine opiates and valium, a known dangerous combination, and paid the price.

Also, funny how most seem to forget that Florida is currently having to completely revamp their opiate prescription laws because doctors down there were abusing the system getting tons of kickbacks from the pharm companies. Why isn't the doctor who prescribed the methadone/valium to someone who didn't need it (if he/she was able to sell it he/she didn't need it) being charged? So many double standards.

IF YOU BREAK A WRITTEN LAW, YOU SHOULD BE CHARGED TO ITS FULLEST EXTENT. PERIOD.

We can argue all day about the right and wrongs of what doctors and pharmacies do but the bottom line is that they have not broken any laws. When Florida REVAMPS, hopefully they will crack down on a lot of the questionable activity. Until then, your point goes nowhere.

tuscavol writes:

in response to chuma:

(This comment was removed by the site staff.)

Very good point.

Footvol2010 writes:

in response to tuscavol:

IF YOU BREAK A WRITTEN LAW, YOU SHOULD BE CHARGED TO ITS FULLEST EXTENT. PERIOD.

We can argue all day about the right and wrongs of what doctors and pharmacies do but the bottom line is that they have not broken any laws. When Florida REVAMPS, hopefully they will crack down on a lot of the questionable activity. Until then, your point goes nowhere.

Right. Back to my earlier point, every business in Knoxville is required by law to have a hitching post. I'm assuming this is a misdemeanor, and the maximum charge for a misdemeanor is 11 months 29 days imprisonment.

According to your logic, for the next year or so, there should be no businesses in the city of Knoxville as all of the owners should be in prison.

Blindly following all written laws simply because someone at one point decided it was important to write it down is folly, and I am very glad you are not involved in the legal system.

I think most of us can agree that the dealer deserves to be hit with the sale of controlled substance charge, but does not deserve the manslaughter charge. Why are you so intent on arguing that?

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