SEC notes: Signing limit vote expected

DESTIN, Fla. -- The annual Southeastern Conference business meetings conclude today with the presidents of the 12 league schools expected to possibly remove the loopholes in the oversigning rule in football.

The presidents began arriving late Thursday afternoon after the league's football, men's basketball and women's basketball coaches departed late Wednesday.

The football coaches voted 12-0 for the conference to maintain its year-old 28-player oversigning limit. A proposal from the league's athletic directors wants to reduce the limit to players signed between Dec. 1 (which would include junior college transfers and early high school graduates) and Aug. 1.

Alabama coach Nick Saban angrily blamed the media for making oversigning an issue.

"You all are creating a bad problem for everybody," Saban said Wednesday, briskly walking away from a group of reporters, staring straight ahead and stopping only to wait for a hotel elevator door to open. "You're going to mess up kids' opportunities by doing what you're doing. You think you're helping them, but you're really hurting them.

"It took one case where somebody didn't get the right opportunity. You need to take the other 100 cases where somebody got an opportunity."

The case Saban is referring to that drew national attention was LSU signee Elliott Porter, who reported for summer school, attended classes for two months and then was told by LSU coach Les Miles he didn't have an available scholarship for the fall. Miles asked Porter to delay his enrollment to January. Porter transferred to Kentucky but returned to LSU as a walk-on.

LSU Chancellor Michael Martin hopes the league at least tweaks the oversigning rule to avoid such cases as Porter.

"We have to set in place a policy that says when you sign a kid, the chance that he may be grayshirted is clear in his mind and in his parents' mind," Martin said. "You don't want that kid spending a summer on campus and then they're gone."

Early TV schedule

The Ole Miss Sept. 3 season opener in Oxford against Brigham Young is set for a 3:45 p.m. CDT kickoff on ESPN.

The SEC announced its early season TV schedule, along with some of its CBS games. Ole Miss and Mississippi State both have 11:21 a.m. kickoffs for a pair of September SEC road games at Vanderbilt and at Auburn, respectively.

Here's the schedule:

Sept. 1: Kentucky vs. Western Kentucky, 8:15 p.m. ESPNU

Sept. 3: Utah State at Auburn, 11 a.m., ESPN or ESPN2; Kent State at Alabama, 11:21 a.m., SEC Network; BYU at Ole Miss, 3:45 p.m., ESPN; Oregon vs. LSU, 7 p.m., ABC; Boise State vs. Georgia, 7 p.m., ESPN

Sept. 10: Mississippi State at Auburn, 11:21 a.m., SEC Network; Cincinnati at Tennessee, 2:30 p.m., ESPN2; South Carolina at Georgia, 3:30 p.m., ESPN

Sept. 15: LSU at Mississippi State, 7 p.m., ESPN

Sept. 17: Auburn at Clemson, 11 a.m., ABC; Ole Miss at Vanderbilt, 11:21 a.m., SEC Network; Tennessee at Florida, 2:30 p.m., CBS; Navy at South Carolina, 5 p.m., ESPN2

Sept. 24: LSU at West Virginia, time to be announced, ABC, ESPN or ESPN2

Oct. 1: Doubleheader, teams TBA, 2:30 p.m./7 p.m., CBS; Ole Miss at Fresno State, 8:15 p.m., ESPN2

Oct. 29: Florida vs. Georgia, 2:30 p.m., CBS

Nov. 12: Doubleheader, teams TBA, 11 a.m./2:30 p.m., CBS

Nov. 25: Arkansas at LSU, 1:30 p.m., CBS

Dec. 3: SEC championship game, 3 p.m., CBS

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Comments » 2

CoverOrange writes:

The 28 limit is a NCAA rule, not just a SEC rule.

Saban is being a bit self centered. Is the opportunity a kid might miss one of going to "a" school or going to Saban's school. If a kid is good enough to get a scholarship offer from Saban, surely he has offers from others. If the problem is non-qualifiers, make a rule that only qualified players can sign.

brauhuff#295403 (Inactive) writes:

25 players a year is plenty. All other conferences abide by 25

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