Presidents approve college football playoff

Charles Steger, president of Virginia Tech, participates in an interview after a BCS presidential oversight committee meeting and media availability, Tuesday, June 26, 2012, in Washington. A committee of university presidents on Tuesday approved the BCS commissioners' plan for a four-team playoff to start in the 2014 season. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

Charles Steger, president of Virginia Tech, participates in an interview after a BCS presidential oversight committee meeting and media availability, Tuesday, June 26, 2012, in Washington. A committee of university presidents on Tuesday approved the BCS commissioners' plan for a four-team playoff to start in the 2014 season. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

Charles Steger, center, president of Virginia Tech, smiles with Gary Ransdell, left, president of Western Kentucky, Duane Nellis, president of Idaho, and Bernie Machen, president of Florida, during a media availability after a BCS presidential oversight committee meeting, Tuesday, June 26, 2012, in Washington. A committee of university presidents on Tuesday approved the BCS commissioners' plan for a four-team playoff to start in the 2014 season. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

Charles Steger, center, president of Virginia Tech, smiles with Gary Ransdell, left, president of Western Kentucky, Duane Nellis, president of Idaho, and Bernie Machen, president of Florida, during a media availability after a BCS presidential oversight committee meeting, Tuesday, June 26, 2012, in Washington. A committee of university presidents on Tuesday approved the BCS commissioners' plan for a four-team playoff to start in the 2014 season. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

Scott Cowen, Tulane University president, speaks during a media availability after a BCS presidential oversight committee meeting, Tuesday, June 26, 2012, in Washington. The committee announced a new post-season format for a four-team playoff for the major college football national championship. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

Scott Cowen, Tulane University president, speaks during a media availability after a BCS presidential oversight committee meeting, Tuesday, June 26, 2012, in Washington. The committee announced a new post-season format for a four-team playoff for the major college football national championship. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

University of Nebraska-Lincoln Chancellor Harvey Perlman speaks during a media availability after a BCS presidential oversight committee meeting, Tuesday, June 26, 2012, in Washington. The committee announced a new post-season format for a four-team playoff for the major college football national championship. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

University of Nebraska-Lincoln Chancellor Harvey Perlman speaks during a media availability after a BCS presidential oversight committee meeting, Tuesday, June 26, 2012, in Washington. The committee announced a new post-season format for a four-team playoff for the major college football national championship. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

University of Nebraska-Lincoln Chancellor Harvey Perlman smiles during an interview after a media availability after a BCS presidential oversight committee meeting, Tuesday, June 26, 2012, in Washington. The committee announced a new post-season format for a four-team playoff for the major college football national championship. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

University of Nebraska-Lincoln Chancellor Harvey Perlman smiles during an interview after a media availability after a BCS presidential oversight committee meeting, Tuesday, June 26, 2012, in Washington. The committee announced a new post-season format for a four-team playoff for the major college football national championship. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

Big Ten Commissioner Jim Delany, second from left, BCS executive director Bill Hancock, center, and SEC Commissioner Mike Slive, second from right, smile during an interview after a BCS presidential oversight committee meeting and media availability, Tuesday, June 26, 2012, in Washington. A committee of university presidents on Tuesday approved the BCS commissioners' plan for a four-team playoff to start in the 2014 season. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

Big Ten Commissioner Jim Delany, second from left, BCS executive director Bill Hancock, center, and SEC Commissioner Mike Slive, second from right, smile during an interview after a BCS presidential oversight committee meeting and media availability, Tuesday, June 26, 2012, in Washington. A committee of university presidents on Tuesday approved the BCS commissioners' plan for a four-team playoff to start in the 2014 season. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

Big Ten Commissioner Jim Delany speaks during a media availability after a BCS presidential oversight committee meeting, Tuesday, June 26, 2012, in Washington. A committee of university presidents on Tuesday approved the BCS commissioners' plan for a four-team playoff to start in the 2014 season. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

Big Ten Commissioner Jim Delany speaks during a media availability after a BCS presidential oversight committee meeting, Tuesday, June 26, 2012, in Washington. A committee of university presidents on Tuesday approved the BCS commissioners' plan for a four-team playoff to start in the 2014 season. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

Bill Hancock, BCS executive director, smiles during an interview after a BCS presidential oversight committee meeting and media availability, Tuesday, June 26, 2012, in Washington. The committee announced a new post-season format for a four-team playoff for the major college football national championship. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

Bill Hancock, BCS executive director, smiles during an interview after a BCS presidential oversight committee meeting and media availability, Tuesday, June 26, 2012, in Washington. The committee announced a new post-season format for a four-team playoff for the major college football national championship. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

Virginia Tech President Charles Steger, third from left, smiles as he and others arrive for a media availability after a BCS presidential oversight committee meeting, Tuesday, June 26, 2012, in Washington. A committee of university presidents on Tuesday approved the BCS commissioners' plan for a four-team playoff to start in the 2014 season. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

Virginia Tech President Charles Steger, third from left, smiles as he and others arrive for a media availability after a BCS presidential oversight committee meeting, Tuesday, June 26, 2012, in Washington. A committee of university presidents on Tuesday approved the BCS commissioners' plan for a four-team playoff to start in the 2014 season. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

From left, Big Ten Commissioner Jim Delany, BCS executive director Bill Hancock and SEC Commissioner Mike Slive smile during an interview after a BCS presidential oversight committee meeting and media availability, Tuesday, June 26, 2012, in Washington. A committee of university presidents on Tuesday approved the BCS commissioners' plan for a four-team playoff to start in the 2014 season. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

From left, Big Ten Commissioner Jim Delany, BCS executive director Bill Hancock and SEC Commissioner Mike Slive smile during an interview after a BCS presidential oversight committee meeting and media availability, Tuesday, June 26, 2012, in Washington. A committee of university presidents on Tuesday approved the BCS commissioners' plan for a four-team playoff to start in the 2014 season. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

WASHINGTON (AP) — Playoffs and tournaments long have determined champions of every college sport from baseball to bowling.

The exception was major college football.

That ended Tuesday. Come 2014, the BCS is dead.

A committee of university presidents approved a plan for a four-team playoff put forward by commissioners of the top football conferences.

For years, the decision-makers had balked at any type of playoff because they said it would diminish the importance of the regular season. If only two teams had a chance to win a championship in the postseason, even one loss could be too many. That made for some very high stakes regular-season games. As recently as 2008, Southeastern Conference Commissioner Mike Slive proposed the type of plan adopted Tuesday, and it was quickly shot down.

Four years later, minds changed. The 12 university presidents stood shoulder to shoulder on a stage at a news conference in a posh hotel in the nation's capital and delivered the news.

"It's a great day for college football," BCS Executive Director Bill Hancock said. "As soon as the commissioners realized they could do this and protect the regular season, the light went on for everybody."

The move completes a six-month process for the commissioners, who have been working on a new way to determine a major college football champion after years of griping from fans. The latest configuration is certain to make even more money for the schools than the old system — and not satisfy everyone.

"There were differences of views," said Virginia Tech President Charles Steger, who headed the BCS presidential oversight committee. "I think it would be a serious mistake to assume it was a rubber stamp."

Nebraska Chancellor Harvey Perlman was the most notable holdout. He had said he preferred the status quo or a tweak of the Bowl Championship Series. Perlman said the playoff still wouldn't be his first choice, but he was not going to stand in the way of progress.

"This is the package that was put forth and we will strongly support it," he said.

Instead of simply matching the nation's No. 1 and No. 2 teams in a title game after the regular season, the way the BCS has done since 1998, the new format will create a pair of national semifinals.

Many college football fans have been clamoring for a playoff for years, and the BCS has been a constant target for criticism. Lawmakers have railed against it. A political action committee was formed, dedicated to its destruction. The Justice Department looked into whether it broke antitrust laws. Even President Obama said he wanted a playoff.

Now it's a reality.

No. 1 will play No. 4, and No. 2 will play No. 3 on Dec. 31 and/or Jan. 1. The sites of those games will rotate among the four current BCS bowls — Rose, Orange, Fiesta and Sugar — and two more to be determined. One of the new sites will likely be wherever the newly formed bowl created by the SEC and Big 12 is played, Slive said.

The Cotton Bowl, played at the $1.1 billion Cowboys Stadium in Arlington, Texas, has long wanted to be part of the BCS and is expected to make a strong push to be in the semifinal rotation.

The winners of the semis will advance to the championship on the first Monday in January that is six or more days after the last semifinal. The first "Championship Monday," as it was called in the BCS release, is set for Jan. 12, 2015.

The site of the title game will move around the way the Super Bowl does, with cities bidding for the right to host.

The teams will be selected by a committee, similar to the way the NCAA basketball tournament field is set. The men's tournament has 68 teams, and 37 at-large bids.

The football committee will have a much tougher task, trying to whittle the field down to four. This season, 125 schools will play at the highest level of college football.

Among the factors the committee will consider are won-loss record, strength of schedule, head-to-head results and whether a team is a conference champion. The selection committee will also play a part in creating matchups for the games at the four sites that do not hold a semifinal in a given year.

"I think it's tremendous progress," Washington State coach Mike Leach, a playoff proponent, said in a telephone interview. "Five years ago there wasn't even dialogue about a playoff. Instead of diving in the water, they dipped their toes in. I think it's' going to be ridiculously exciting and it's going to generate a bunch of money. I wish they dived in."

The BCS had given automatic qualifying status to six conferences, the SEC, Big Ten, Big 12, Atlantic Coast Conference, Pac-12 and Big East. That allowed those leagues better access to the big, high-payout games than the other five conferences, such as the Mountain West and Conference USA.

Automatically qualified status is gone and the commissioners believe the new system will create more interesting games beyond the ones that determine the national title.

"What the system now is, several semifinals, championship game and some access bowls. By creating a couple of access bowls, people will be able to play high-quality opponents in big venues with big brands," Big Ten Commissioner Jim Delany said.

No one has put a hard number on it yet, but this new format figures to more than double the TV revenue of the current BCS and Rose Bowl contracts. Those pay out about $155 million annually.

The commissioners want to lock in this format for 12 years with a television partner. The current four-year BCS deal with ESPN runs through the 2013 season. The new format will be presented to potential TV partners in the fall, starting with ESPN.

"I think we have found what we think is the right place and it stabilizes the postseason for a length of time that I think is healthy for the game," said Slive, whose members have won the last six BCS championships.

There are still some details to work out — such as who will be on the committee and what new bowls will be involved in the semifinal rotation — but all the decision-makers are on board.

Lower divisions of college football already have a playoff, but the highest level has always used bowls and polls to determine its champion. Those days are coming to an end.

"We believe this new format will be good for student-athletes, for the alumni and for our institutions," Steger said. "It's a best of both worlds result. It captures the excitement of the playoff while protecting the regular season."

___

Follow Ralph D. Russo at www.Twitter.com/ralphdrussoAP

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Comments » 44

Huttdawg100 writes:

Playoffs will ruin college football, because it is inevitable that 4 teams will become 8, which will become 16, thus lessening the importance of the regular season. Teams with 3 or 4 losses will be able to back into a playoff slot, catch fire and win the National championship (like the New York Giants in the NFL). Does the number 16 team really deserve a shot at the title? No. This is a money grab and the powers that be are injecting poison into a wonderful sport. Boise

Huttdawg100 writes:

I'm glad the Big 12 finally got a real commissioner. Chuck Norris will put Texas in their place.

thevoice writes:

in response to Huttdawg100:

Playoffs will ruin college football, because it is inevitable that 4 teams will become 8, which will become 16, thus lessening the importance of the regular season. Teams with 3 or 4 losses will be able to back into a playoff slot, catch fire and win the National championship (like the New York Giants in the NFL). Does the number 16 team really deserve a shot at the title? No. This is a money grab and the powers that be are injecting poison into a wonderful sport. Boise

I think "they" will somehow work the 4 teams (two games) into the existing bowl structure and the winners play each other in one game, effectively just a +1. Sure hope they don't go beyond 4 teams. When is the last time a No. 5 team went into bowl season and came out the NC? Haven't done my homework, but would guess never. So, if a No. 5 pre-bowl team has no shot at a NC, how can the No. 16 team? If it goes beyond 4, we shall know for sure it's all about the $. But, someday I wouldn't mind seeing my Vols play in a few more games.

It's basically an ego thing. 15 years ago the school presidents said no more games/season because it takes the "student-athlete" away from the academics. Wonder what they say now.

voloffaith writes:

11 conference commissioners AND Norte Dame(which poster always refers to nd as Norte?) Sorry Hutt Hutt...Chuck Neinas....not Ranger Walker....

govolsn3 writes:

I didnt think that the ACC had any say so in this but I guess that I was wrong. With so many conferences 4 teams will never make it. I think 8 is the right number with 6 major conference champions (including a conference championship game in all six) and 2 at large bids is the best for everyone and this is just a stab in the dark, actually have them at the end of the regular season instead of waiting a month to get things going. I remember the good ol days when I was off for New Years and seen the best football from daylingt till midnight, where now I have to watch only half of the championship game in the middle of the work week and then wait till the next morning to see who won. Oh well, just a thought.

smyrnavol1 writes:

11 and ND? Who the hell is ND? They should have no say in this matter. Join a conference then talk.

FanNotSheep writes:

Hate to see a playoff become so inclusive as to make the regular season less important. Everyone has an agenda, and I hope someone remembers the players and all the fans who travel to bowl games for a fun getaway and to support their school/team. It gets lost in the stacks of money, but there are other things besides TV viewers to consider.

I think the Big Ten and PAC 12 should form their own little football league and have a mythical national championship. They could have their trophy -- maybe Woody Hayes coming off the sideline and tackling a player running for a touchdown. That would perfectly illustrate what sore losers they all are.

If you are one of the best four teams you will play for the title. If you are not, I don't care if you are the best team from the overrated Big Ten (where they apparently can't do math either) or USC and the 11 afterthoughts, you don't get to play for a title. Sorry, but that's the best we can do unless and until the day comes where four 16-team superconferences and the resulting 8 division winners fight it out. If that happens the teams from the crybaby leagues will surely be represented.

dvols writes:

4 teams is a beauty pagent

make it 8 teams / 6 conference champs and two at large

shamrocktexasvol writes:

in response to smyrnavol1:

11 and ND? Who the hell is ND? They should have no say in this matter. Join a conference then talk.

Agree If nd has their way and the sports writers have their way,nd will be one of the 4 teams every year.

FanNotSheep writes:

in response to shamrocktexasvol:

Agree If nd has their way and the sports writers have their way,nd will be one of the 4 teams every year.

The chances of Notre Dame having a record that qualifies them for this playoff: Zero.

The Irish live in the past, as do the Big 10, Little 12 or whatever it is these days. Even if they ever get there, they would be embarrassed (again) by whoever represents the SEC.

nocleats writes:

Cant see how Notre Dame had any say in this at all, or why anyone listened to their concerns. They should join the Big !0 if they want a chance... TOTAL BS!!!!!

tennrich1 writes:

All it will take is three of the four teams being from the SEC (and that could easily happen with the new alignments and all) and then nation will want to scrap and start over...but for now...lets wait and see...

2407westTN_VOLSfan writes:

What happens when there is a tie for the 4th place team? Will there be complaints if there are 3 SEC teams in the top 4? Almost happened last year. I don't want to see a biased committee pick their favorite local team to be included. Conference champs would not be a qualification in my opinion. Bama would not have been in it if that had been the case last year. It will prove to have problems, but I am okay with it. I think the final game should be at an NFL stadium that anties up the most moola in the long run.

10SE writes:

Four teams is not a playoff. It should be the top eight, at minimum. This four team thing still allows for too much politics. People in power can not be trusted.

BIVOLAR_BEARE writes:

Hopefully they can go back to having the big bowls on NYD again..By the time they play the rest of the bowls unless the match ups are of national importance nobody cares..This is at least an effort and the gateway to a full scale playoff..It's about time.

orangeman1 writes:

in response to Huttdawg100:

Playoffs will ruin college football, because it is inevitable that 4 teams will become 8, which will become 16, thus lessening the importance of the regular season. Teams with 3 or 4 losses will be able to back into a playoff slot, catch fire and win the National championship (like the New York Giants in the NFL). Does the number 16 team really deserve a shot at the title? No. This is a money grab and the powers that be are injecting poison into a wonderful sport. Boise

I'm excited to see the best 4 teams play for the title. Oklahoma st. deserved a shot last year, and there are many years when there wasnt a clear cut #2. Who cares about the money. The fans are going to reap the benefit too. I also like the idea of playing the title game in various cities. It will be big time. Tradition in college football was lost a long time ago and its just changing with the times. I doubt it will go to more teams anytime soon. They dont want to let the minor conferences in on the money. Last year, if they just went by record and strength of schedule, Oklahoma st wouldve played LSU instead of Bama at the end of regular season so I think a 4 team playoff is the best thing for college football. Heck, I wouldnt mind seeing 8 teams, but anymore than that would be too much.

FLORIDAGATORHATER writes:

Finally!! This is sooooo much better than the current system. This will end the controversy once and for all. If you aren't good enough to make the top four in the nation then you can't complain. Period. This is great news in an otherwise dreary news cycle.

10seVol85_Part_Deux writes:

No. Make it 14 teams. Conference champions get in, + at-large teams to fill out the field. Choose the at-large teams based on BCS rankings (highest non-champions). Seed the tourney using BCS rankings too, with #1 and #2 getting first-round byes, and #3-#8 getting home-field advantage in the first round.

The only teams that could clinch a bid before the season was over are those who lock up their conference championship because they don't have a championship game. Even those rare instances involve teams still trying to get in that top 8 seeding for home-field or a bye.

That keeps every game just as important as it is now. It also doesn't impact all those other bowl games that are consolation prizes for winning 6 games, because 14 teams use 7 bowl venues.

10seVol85_Part_Deux writes:

in response to Enrico_Palazzo:

(This comment was removed by the site staff.)

and some sort of teabag clause in case they win.

UT4prez writes:

This is just the next train wreck of a system. Did anyone watch the Sports Source? They showed 4 years of BCS rankings and asked who gets in the playoff. Yes it would have been great last year but 3 of the 4 years they showed would have been a nightmare. I'm tired of the system getting changed to fit the situation of the most recent year and latest disaster without looking at how it would work over a long period of time. I'm with 85. Let every single conference champ in so no one can complain and fill with at large. I would do 16 teams with no byes. 16 of 125 teams is not too many. Use BCS rankings to pick at large and seed. Forget the committee. The regular season would still mean something because you would really want to win your conference. Teams would still play good non conference games for at large consideration. I say expand now before the next train wreck or scrap it, go back to the old bowl alignments and then play 1 vs 2 after the old bowl alignments are played out.

10seVol85_Part_Deux writes:

in response to UT4prez:

This is just the next train wreck of a system. Did anyone watch the Sports Source? They showed 4 years of BCS rankings and asked who gets in the playoff. Yes it would have been great last year but 3 of the 4 years they showed would have been a nightmare. I'm tired of the system getting changed to fit the situation of the most recent year and latest disaster without looking at how it would work over a long period of time. I'm with 85. Let every single conference champ in so no one can complain and fill with at large. I would do 16 teams with no byes. 16 of 125 teams is not too many. Use BCS rankings to pick at large and seed. Forget the committee. The regular season would still mean something because you would really want to win your conference. Teams would still play good non conference games for at large consideration. I say expand now before the next train wreck or scrap it, go back to the old bowl alignments and then play 1 vs 2 after the old bowl alignments are played out.

My idea for 14 vs 16, and having the byes and home-field advantage, is to do everything possible to keep the regular season as great as it is now. You want to win your conference, and even if you're in one of those conferences that doesn't have a championship game, and you clinch it before the end of the season, you don't want to miss out on that bye or home-field if you could have gotten it. You don't want to sit your stars and lose that carrot.

There's no denying that FBS football's regular season is probably the best of any sport. I think it's necessary to hold out as many carrots as possible to make sure everybody plays every game like it's critical. 14 teams instead of 16 also makes it possible to play the tournament without impacting the other 25,000 bowl games.

Just trying to keep everybody happy.

UTistheOLEMISSoftheEAST writes:

As if this will affect ut football. That's comical. Fortunately for ut fans, there's always Nashville and Shreveport for those New Year's Holiday getaways. Maybe college football needs an NIT?

dvhill100 writes:

Okay, Coach Dooley. You have your work cut out for you. Coach Fulmer took the first BCS Championship. Your turn to take the first playoff championship in 2015.

CarlChilders writes:

Four major bowls just like now, and one championship just like now. The only difference I see is two additional teams will be in contention. It took a panel of commissioners six months to decide this? Smells of a GSA scenario. Wonder where the meetings were held? Vegas? Hawaii?

DeltaCharlie3 writes:

in response to Lane_Kiffins_Daddy_Wears_Diapers:

(This comment was removed by the site staff.)

The SEC will surely dominate this format too!

CarlChilders writes:

Correction. Two additional bowls will be included in the semi-final mix. Now I understand why it took six months.

SevenT writes:

I see Tennessee in the playoff mix real soon! With Dooleave on the sidelines this is practically a given.

GBO

BIVOLAR_BEARE writes:

in response to SevenT:

I see Tennessee in the playoff mix real soon! With Dooleave on the sidelines this is practically a given.

GBO

Like Joker Phillips will be?? LMAO @ tucky!!

HighPlainsVol writes:

in response to 10SE:

Four teams is not a playoff. It should be the top eight, at minimum. This four team thing still allows for too much politics. People in power can not be trusted.

Agree that it should be an 8-team playoff. Teams like TCU and Boise State will have no chance regardless of how good they may be. I prefer 8 12-team conferences, with each conference having a championship game and the 8 conference champions compete in a playoff.

Orange_Juiced writes:

in response to CarlChilders:

Four major bowls just like now, and one championship just like now. The only difference I see is two additional teams will be in contention. It took a panel of commissioners six months to decide this? Smells of a GSA scenario. Wonder where the meetings were held? Vegas? Hawaii?

This ^ +1. All the commish and prez have done is take the same thing we got now...put a pretty little bow on it and called it a "Playoff." "Yeah...that should keep the lowly masses off our backs for another decade or so," say they. TV and conferences set to make gazillions now with this latest marketing ploy...cool.

Orange_Juiced writes:

Oh I suppose the four major bowls will have to feel a little pain now being told who to take every other year. The "Granddaddy" will have to see the likes of SEC vs. (insert preferred candidate here)...and they will have to cry a little bit at not having the West Coast elites (plus Utah) vs. the almost Ivy League in their own minds.

DalTexVol writes:

in response to Huttdawg100:

Playoffs will ruin college football, because it is inevitable that 4 teams will become 8, which will become 16, thus lessening the importance of the regular season. Teams with 3 or 4 losses will be able to back into a playoff slot, catch fire and win the National championship (like the New York Giants in the NFL). Does the number 16 team really deserve a shot at the title? No. This is a money grab and the powers that be are injecting poison into a wonderful sport. Boise

Couldn't disagree more. How important is the regular season when an undefeated team like a Boise State, TCU, etc. gets passed over for a shot at a National championship because some committee/poll doesn't rank them high enough?

The 4 team playoff is a step in the right direction, but it still involves a committee. Over time we will get to a playoff system involving conference champions. If Division 1 FCS can do it, so can everyone else. Don't worry there will still be plenty of drama in the regular season.

Huttdawg100 writes:

in response to orangeman1:

I'm excited to see the best 4 teams play for the title. Oklahoma st. deserved a shot last year, and there are many years when there wasnt a clear cut #2. Who cares about the money. The fans are going to reap the benefit too. I also like the idea of playing the title game in various cities. It will be big time. Tradition in college football was lost a long time ago and its just changing with the times. I doubt it will go to more teams anytime soon. They dont want to let the minor conferences in on the money. Last year, if they just went by record and strength of schedule, Oklahoma st wouldve played LSU instead of Bama at the end of regular season so I think a 4 team playoff is the best thing for college football. Heck, I wouldnt mind seeing 8 teams, but anymore than that would be too much.

I don't see how the fans will benefit from this; the fans are going to pay more money for travel. Imagine this scenario: We win the SEC East and we have to travel to Atlanta. Then we win the SEC Championship, and the next trip is to New Orleans for the Sugar Bowl. We win the Sugar Bowl and now we have to travel to Miami or LA because they out-bid everyone for the opportunity to host the National Championship game. That's a lot of hotel rooms, a lot of gas money and a lot of confusion during the already confusing holiday season. College football is not the NFL. It's very regional, but the powers that be are ruining the sport by attempting to go National.

That said, the playoff would give me a chance to spend more time at the bar... I guess that's one benefit.

Huttdawg100 writes:

in response to DalTexVol:

Couldn't disagree more. How important is the regular season when an undefeated team like a Boise State, TCU, etc. gets passed over for a shot at a National championship because some committee/poll doesn't rank them high enough?

The 4 team playoff is a step in the right direction, but it still involves a committee. Over time we will get to a playoff system involving conference champions. If Division 1 FCS can do it, so can everyone else. Don't worry there will still be plenty of drama in the regular season.

IDK. Strength of schedule still means something to me. I refuse to respect Boise St. or TCU for playing cupcake schedules in the WAC and Mountain West year in and year out. They play one team a year that might give them a decent game, but even with those games against UGA or Va Tech, they have weeks or months to prepare in advance. They don't have to deal with the injuries that come up in the middle of the season. I'm gonna need to see them HAMMER a Bama or USC or LSU before I would say they honestly deserve a shot at the title. Look at Utah: in 2010 they went 7-1 in the Mountain West. In 2011 they went 4-5 in the Pac 12. They weren't that good. I think they are well coached, and I'd love to have Gary Patterson or Chris Petersen in Knoxville. But their current teams aren't worthy of the National Championship game. Boise and TCU going 12-0 and not getting a shot at the title doesn't mean the regular season isn't important. They didn't play a tough enough schedule to be number 1.

DalTexVol writes:

in response to Huttdawg100:

IDK. Strength of schedule still means something to me. I refuse to respect Boise St. or TCU for playing cupcake schedules in the WAC and Mountain West year in and year out. They play one team a year that might give them a decent game, but even with those games against UGA or Va Tech, they have weeks or months to prepare in advance. They don't have to deal with the injuries that come up in the middle of the season. I'm gonna need to see them HAMMER a Bama or USC or LSU before I would say they honestly deserve a shot at the title. Look at Utah: in 2010 they went 7-1 in the Mountain West. In 2011 they went 4-5 in the Pac 12. They weren't that good. I think they are well coached, and I'd love to have Gary Patterson or Chris Petersen in Knoxville. But their current teams aren't worthy of the National Championship game. Boise and TCU going 12-0 and not getting a shot at the title doesn't mean the regular season isn't important. They didn't play a tough enough schedule to be number 1.

The other problem with the regular season is that the SEC (and other major conferences) schedule too many cupcake games so they will have fewer losses (or no losses). With a playoff system involving conference champions there is less of a need to schedule these type of games. Oh, the Georgia States and Appalachian States will still be on schedules--but not nearly as much.

CarlChilders writes:

I do see this as laying the foundation for an expansion once the money gets to flowing, but I think eight teams allow a few second chances to some who may not have earned it in the regular season. Every year the controversy swirls around one or two teams getting left out, not five or six.

PennVol writes:

The SEC champion should get a bye all the way to the NC game. Let the playoff only serve to determine who gets the SEC smackdown.

VolzsFan writes:

Actually, the current TV deal for the BCS games is $125 million per year. If they increase by 5 times (will not happen) that would be $600 million per year.

The NCAA Men's basketball tournament is $771 million annually.

Little perspective boys.

Huttdawg100 writes:

in response to DalTexVol:

The other problem with the regular season is that the SEC (and other major conferences) schedule too many cupcake games so they will have fewer losses (or no losses). With a playoff system involving conference champions there is less of a need to schedule these type of games. Oh, the Georgia States and Appalachian States will still be on schedules--but not nearly as much.

I think the opposite is gonna happen, especially in the SEC. We'll no longer see LSU vs West Virginia or Tennessee vs Oregon. SEC coaches and leadership (Spurrier) are already saying that the SEC is tough enough, hence the new 6-1-1 conference format. They're already trying to get more cupcakes on the schedule to give themselves a chance to get an automatic bid for the BCS. I think we'll see more cupcakes because of the expanded SEC. Furthermore, the SEC champion each of the last 6 years has played for the national championship. All you gotta do is win the SEC and you're in, so there's no need to schedule a USC or Michigan St.

shamrocktexasvol writes:

in response to FanNotSheep:

The chances of Notre Dame having a record that qualifies them for this playoff: Zero.

The Irish live in the past, as do the Big 10, Little 12 or whatever it is these days. Even if they ever get there, they would be embarrassed (again) by whoever represents the SEC.

By 2015 nd will be playing divII divIII schools and SoCal going 12-1 and the toast of college football accoring to ESPN and 1 of the four teams in the playoffs keeping out _______ fill in name of school.

justafan4ut writes:

I've read all the scenerios that has been batted about. I think imho that the 8-team playoff would be best, because, the six conference champions and two at-large, but if a conference champion is not at least 10-2 in regular season they can't be eligable. No more than two losses. Then that would make the regular season important and also give the BS and TCU's a chance to get in with a 12-0 or 11-1 record. They also should keep the BCS scoring format, I think it makes it less bias.

Tau_of_Tennessee writes:

The Plus One proposal does a better job of resolving the Boise State, TCU dilemma than a four team playoff. It is rather common to end up the season with four traditional powers to have one or no losses and that again leaves these good fellows on the outside looking in. An undefeated Boise, Utah, or TCU is not going to leap frog a one loss Alabama, LSU, FSU, USC, Oklahoma, Florida, OSU, Texas, or Oregon. In the current system if TCU goes undefeated in the regular season and knocks off a big boy in the bowls they will be in the plus one game 99% of the time.

Additionally my concern is that the four team system will turn into 8 teams and then 16 teams. The NCAA basketball tournament started out with 8 teams and is now 65 and the FBS started out with 4 teams and is now either 16 or 20 (with play-in games I think). Four teams does not diminish excitement in regular season but 16 teams does to some degree. One of the great things about D1 college football is that every regular season game is crucial. There is no backing into the playoffs and getting hot. Also as any statistician will tell you the larger the sample group (in this case regular season games) the less likelihood for error (having a team other than the best team win). The extra excitement at playoff time is simply a deferral from the regular season. Game Day on ESPN is so exciting because there is a quasi playoff game almost every weekend in Sept/Oct/Nov on a D1 campus somewhere in the country.

FanNotSheep writes:

Two scenarios: Superconferences are on the way. Four 16-team leagues with two divisions in each, with the conference championship game acting as a virtual first round of the playoffs. Then the winners -- one from each conference -- play for the title, and the rest of college football plays among themselves for their own title. Of course, the Big Boys will still play the little brothers in non-conference games to get an occasional breather between conference games. Seven division games plus two intra divisional games and three non-cons.

OR: Things will go the other way, back to smaller conferences, as the need to align with power conference goes away due to the expanded playoff system, which may wind up at 8 games. This may be more likely, but that means the NCAA, with its ridiculous rule book, still gets to run (ruin) things.

UT4prez writes:

The only way this works is if they just go by the BCS rankings. However, that is not the intent. The majority of the world doesn't want 2 SEC teams playing for the national title. Hence, the extra emphasis on being a conference champion. And the committee is why this won't work. Use the BCS, please!!!!

Let's see the committee explain why they leave the #3 BCS team out and put the #5 team in. Smells like a lawsuit to me.

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