Butch Jones says Riyahd Jones has 'leg injury'

SAUL YOUNG/NEWS SENTINEL
Defensive backs Riyahd Jones, left, and Devaun Swafford drill during practice at Haslam Field on Aug. 2.

Photo by Saul Young

SAUL YOUNG/NEWS SENTINEL Defensive backs Riyahd Jones, left, and Devaun Swafford drill during practice at Haslam Field on Aug. 2.

Tennessee’s precarious depth at cornerback might not be as grave as it appeared on Monday.

UT coach Butch Jones said Tuesday junior Riyahd Jones, a projected started at cornerback, has “a leg injury” and is “still undergoing evaluation.”

Everything seen from Riyahd Jones on Tuesday, though, showed positive signs.

Last seen the day before propped up on crutches, Riyahd Jones tried to ease any concerns on Tuesday on Twitter with a tweet saying “i assure you i havent torn anything or tweaked my knee.”

Later in the day, Riyahd Jones arrived on the field without crutches.

Butch Jones didn’t offer any additional clarity, saying only, “We’ll know more as time progresses but that’s all we’ll say on that.”

Riyahd Jones’ apparent injury immediately riled concern from the Vols’ fanbase. Of all positions, UT can ill-afford any more losses at cornerback. Pickings are so slim that wideout Vincent Dallas shifted to corner on Monday to bolster the team’s options.

There has been an addition to the defensive backfield injury front, though. Walk-on cornerback Michael Williams, who spent last year with UT’s track and field team, arrived at Tuesday’s practice with his right arm in a sling. The redshirt freshman has seen a handful of reps with both the second and first team defenses in the last few days.

“He had a shoulder injury in our scrimmage and he’s progressing,” Butch Jones said. “We anticipate getting him back here in the next couple days.”

Dallas, meanwhile, remained at cornerback for Tuesday’s practice. It’s not foreign territory, as he’s been yo-yoed between wideout and defensive back before.

After working as a reserve receiver as a freshman in 2011, Dallas volunteered to switch to cornerback last summer. He remained there through camp, but switched back to receiver in late August and caught nine passes for 149 yards last season.

Following Tuesday’s practice, Dallas said his move to corner is still considered “experimental” and that he’s “used to sudden change.”

On Monday, UT defensive backs coach Willie Martinez complimented Dallas’ attitude and willingness to fill the team’s needs. Regarding the Georgia native’s play, Martinez said, “He’s got awareness and anytime you play the opposite position, in this case wide receiver and defensive back, there are a lot of similarities and lingo that he hears so he knows how to attack it.”

Martinez added the staff will keep Dallas at cornerback “for a couple days.”

It could be longer. At this point UT needs bodies in the secondary.

Since last season, the Vols lost six letterman at defensive back: Prentiss Waggner (graduation), Marsalis Teague (graduation), Rod Wilks (graduation), Eric Gordon (left program), Daniel Gray (transferred to Utah State) and Deion Bonner (dismissed). Naz Oliver, a seldom-used, injury-plagued defensive back recently left UT to finish his degree closer to his New Jersey home.

Only Byron Moore, Justin Coleman, JaRon Toney, LaDarrell McNeil and Brian Randolph have any discernible college experience. Of that group, just Coleman and Toney are true cornerbacks.

Those two aren’t exactly wily veterans. Coleman has 13 career starts in 24 games played. Toney has four starts in 11 appearances.

Asked Monday about his freshmen corners Cameron Sutton and Malik Foreman, defensive coordinator John Jancek said the chances are “pretty good” that one will start presumably opposite Coleman.

“Malik and Cameron are going to play,” Jancek said. “That’s the reality of it.”

Get Copyright Permissions © 2013, Knoxville News Sentinel Co.
Want to use this article? Click here for options!

© 2013 govolsxtra.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

  • Discuss
  • Print

Comments » 15

y9since80 writes:

I'm really confused, I thought today was Tuesday and tomorrow would be Wednesday. GO VOLS

volbob writes:

in response to y9since80:

I'm really confused, I thought today was Tuesday and tomorrow would be Wednesday. GO VOLS

It's free beer tomorrow...or something like that.

BolivrBob writes:

UT coach Butch Jones said Wednesday junior Riyahd Jones, a projected started at cornerback, has “a leg injury” and is “still undergoing evaluation.”............He said "tomorrow" he is a projected "started" .......Geesh!........also the vague term "leg injury" sounds more like a Dooley statement than Butch, who usually communicates clearly.

ThaiVolFan writes:

Grear news on Jones. Hope we have no more major dings or injuries for the rest of camp so we can focus on the normal players playing their proper positions and getting the continued coaching, experiance and familiarity that is needed...especially between new wide-out/qb tandums. Get well soon Riyahd.
GBO!

tovolny writes:

The injuries on all teams usually pretty much even out. Last year's injuries for the Vols were a little more than normal, however. I hate injuries but it is part of the game. I think the medical world has lagged way behind on developing innovative apparel for athletes. Anklets and knee hose on the order of reinforced, non-collapsable radiator hoses are coming in the near future. I think Canada and the CFL will be testing the Canadian versions in 2015. Some of the proposed uniforms look like space warriors right out of a Flash Gordon comic book. Shoulder pads will be smaller with a strong non-woven fabric that secures the helmet. This helmet's face mask is replaced by a clear face shield which is incorporated into the shoulder pad fabric. There is no way a defender can get his hands under the shield, thus no more face mask penalties.
The new safety uniforms will take some getting used to; however, by the year 2020 people will be laughing at the present day uniforms. The face mask (tackling handle) and the shoulder pads ( body levers) as we know them now, will be things of football yore. WE NEED THESE THINGS NOW...especially the clear, slightly bubbled face shields that replaces the face masks.

LibertyVolance writes:

What about Tino Thomas, RS FR DB? Is he a safety?

Henley-Street-Bridge writes:

I'm just glad that Maurice is finally getting off the Couch.

Vol43 writes:

in response to BolivrBob:

UT coach Butch Jones said Wednesday junior Riyahd Jones, a projected started at cornerback, has “a leg injury” and is “still undergoing evaluation.”............He said "tomorrow" he is a projected "started" .......Geesh!........also the vague term "leg injury" sounds more like a Dooley statement than Butch, who usually communicates clearly.

Based on the rumblings I'm hearing, this is more on the player than on coach

NashvillePreds writes:

in response to BolivrBob:

UT coach Butch Jones said Wednesday junior Riyahd Jones, a projected started at cornerback, has “a leg injury” and is “still undergoing evaluation.”............He said "tomorrow" he is a projected "started" .......Geesh!........also the vague term "leg injury" sounds more like a Dooley statement than Butch, who usually communicates clearly.

In the NHL playoffs, teams are known to announce certain players have either, "lower body, or upper body" injuries. The lack of detail is to avoid giving anyone outside the organization a competitive advantage by divulging too much information. Butch is sharing this same mindset. I am sure he is not concerned some in message-board-land find his approach unappealing.

Go Vols

bUTch_please writes:

in response to Vol43:

Based on the rumblings I'm hearing, this is more on the player than on coach

Drama-enhanced mystery injury to skip a little 2 a day - 0

Coach Jones - 1

Vol43 writes:

in response to bUTch_please:

Drama-enhanced mystery injury to skip a little 2 a day - 0

Coach Jones - 1

Bingo!

NeylandWest writes:

in response to tovolny:

The injuries on all teams usually pretty much even out. Last year's injuries for the Vols were a little more than normal, however. I hate injuries but it is part of the game. I think the medical world has lagged way behind on developing innovative apparel for athletes. Anklets and knee hose on the order of reinforced, non-collapsable radiator hoses are coming in the near future. I think Canada and the CFL will be testing the Canadian versions in 2015. Some of the proposed uniforms look like space warriors right out of a Flash Gordon comic book. Shoulder pads will be smaller with a strong non-woven fabric that secures the helmet. This helmet's face mask is replaced by a clear face shield which is incorporated into the shoulder pad fabric. There is no way a defender can get his hands under the shield, thus no more face mask penalties.
The new safety uniforms will take some getting used to; however, by the year 2020 people will be laughing at the present day uniforms. The face mask (tackling handle) and the shoulder pads ( body levers) as we know them now, will be things of football yore. WE NEED THESE THINGS NOW...especially the clear, slightly bubbled face shields that replaces the face masks.

Futuristic space warrior uniforms? I'm interested in this. I've heard of NASCAR-inspired helmet designs (where the helmet is attached to the uniform and supports the neck). However, "the non-collapsable radiator hoses" has my curiosity raised. Please share more info regarding this.

tovolny writes:

in response to NeylandWest:

Futuristic space warrior uniforms? I'm interested in this. I've heard of NASCAR-inspired helmet designs (where the helmet is attached to the uniform and supports the neck). However, "the non-collapsable radiator hoses" has my curiosity raised. Please share more info regarding this.

Non-corrugated hoses (molded) usually have a steel spring within the fabricated rubber to prevent the hoses from sucking shut. Corrugated hoses prevent collapsing by using a series (chain) of stiff rings connected by a flexible fabric giving some ability to adjust length and locations requiring several bends. The corrugated type are what the new uniforms mimic. Knees have only one plane of movement, thus the hoses only allow movement in the intended plane with very little bending in any other direction while preventing this large joint from flexing sideways. Elbows have only one plane of motion when referenced to the arm from shoulder to the elbow. Shoulders and hips bend radially in universal fashion and as long as these joint don't come out of socket, injuries are minimal. Ankles are the most difficult to protect because they need to bend from side to side in addition to the stepping plane. A protected ankle exacerbates the knee stress and a protected knee can over stress the ankle. The shoulders and hips of the uniforms utilize what is being called a himi-hose because the corrugated hoses don't completely wrap around the entire joint. As soon as the design solves the problem of the shoulder pads pinching the bellies and waists of the opposing players, these innovative uniforms will swiftly sweep the world. Nascar is wanting in on this too, but their design will incorporate a special seat and a large fishbowl cover that is lowered over heir heads. The design criteria for nascar includes a 72 degree, perfect atmosphere situation that is completely fire proof for 6 minutes after a crash.

Sorry, the think tank URL is not available for public use at this time. You might find some information at Bioengineering for Impact Sports.

NeylandWest writes:

in response to tovolny:

Non-corrugated hoses (molded) usually have a steel spring within the fabricated rubber to prevent the hoses from sucking shut. Corrugated hoses prevent collapsing by using a series (chain) of stiff rings connected by a flexible fabric giving some ability to adjust length and locations requiring several bends. The corrugated type are what the new uniforms mimic. Knees have only one plane of movement, thus the hoses only allow movement in the intended plane with very little bending in any other direction while preventing this large joint from flexing sideways. Elbows have only one plane of motion when referenced to the arm from shoulder to the elbow. Shoulders and hips bend radially in universal fashion and as long as these joint don't come out of socket, injuries are minimal. Ankles are the most difficult to protect because they need to bend from side to side in addition to the stepping plane. A protected ankle exacerbates the knee stress and a protected knee can over stress the ankle. The shoulders and hips of the uniforms utilize what is being called a himi-hose because the corrugated hoses don't completely wrap around the entire joint. As soon as the design solves the problem of the shoulder pads pinching the bellies and waists of the opposing players, these innovative uniforms will swiftly sweep the world. Nascar is wanting in on this too, but their design will incorporate a special seat and a large fishbowl cover that is lowered over heir heads. The design criteria for nascar includes a 72 degree, perfect atmosphere situation that is completely fire proof for 6 minutes after a crash.

Sorry, the think tank URL is not available for public use at this time. You might find some information at Bioengineering for Impact Sports.

That is some awesome info! I completely (and respectfully) thank you for taking the time to reply and educate me. I'm sort of blown away by the possibilities of these technologies, especially in relation to the ankle and knee. This is a lot of info to chew on for a while.

johnlg00 writes:

in response to NeylandWest:

That is some awesome info! I completely (and respectfully) thank you for taking the time to reply and educate me. I'm sort of blown away by the possibilities of these technologies, especially in relation to the ankle and knee. This is a lot of info to chew on for a while.

Yeah, tovolny has come up with several of these gems of information. He is clearly a person in touch with a number of exciting developments in technology of all kinds. The new unis may look odd to us old-timers, but if they make players safer, I'm all in favor of that.

Want to participate in the conversation? Become a subscriber today. Subscribers can read and comment on any story, anytime. Non-subscribers will only be able to view comments on select stories.

Features