Second Harvest Food Bank gets surplus food from Vols football games

Tennessee coach Butch Jones walks down the sideline during the first half against Vanderbilt Saturday, Nov 23, 2013 in Neyland Stadium in Knoxville. Tenn.  (MICHAEL PATRICK/NEWS SENTINEL)

Photo by Michael Patrick, Knoxville News Sentinel

Tennessee coach Butch Jones walks down the sideline during the first half against Vanderbilt Saturday, Nov 23, 2013 in Neyland Stadium in Knoxville. Tenn. (MICHAEL PATRICK/NEWS SENTINEL)

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Thousands of pounds of surplus food from Tennessee home football games have gone to charity.

Tennessee announced Thursday through a university release that 3,710 pounds of unused food from Neyland Stadium was donated to Second Harvest Food Bank during the 2013 football season.

Surplus food from Neyland Stadium concessions started going to charity at the beginning of the 2012 season. This season's Nov. 23 home finale against Vanderbilt marked the first time that unused food from the Neyland Stadium skyboxes also was donated. UT Recycling, in partnership with the UT Food Recovery Network and ARAMARK, donated 606 pounds of unused food from the skyboxes to Second Harvest after the Vanderbilt game.

The possibility of donating unused food from other catered events around campus is under discussion.

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Comments » 1

threehundredbowler writes:

Good for UT. I volunteer one thursday a month and help with the distribution of food to the needy.Believe me when I say some of these families have nearly nothing to eat. My wife and I also take 1 needy family a week to a nice buffet resturant.For most of these families,it is the only time they get a decent meal.For everyone that can afford to do so,I promise you will be greately rewarded. Please help feed the hungry in your town.

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