Video highlights of Alabama vs Tennessee, Jan. 26, 2013

Video highlights of the Tennessee's 54-53 men's basketball win over Alabama in Knoxville on Saturday, Jan. 26, 2013.

This video may not display correctly on some smartphones and tablets.

© 2013 govolsxtra.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

  • Discuss
  • Print

Related Stories

Comments » 5

albert63 writes:

first, lucky

AllVols16 writes:

A win is a win!!!

johnlg00 writes:

Glad to see that since I couldn't watch it yesterday due to a MAJOR fumble by TWC in my area. Happy to see how much Jarnell was using the backboard yesterday. IMHO, the hardest shot in basketball is the soft jumper in close aimed to go straight in the basket. When you are working as hard physically as you have to do to get off a shot inside, it is just counterintuitive that you will in the same move have the fine touch and judgment to get the ball JUST over the rim. Also, that view of the last play looked more like a foul than it did the first time I saw it. However, it did look like Lacey was trying more to draw the foul than to make the shot, and his exaggerated attempt to make it LOOK like he drew the foul probably discouraged the refs from giving him the call. In any case, I agree with a poster on the main game thread who said that playing for a 3-pointer in that situation was a far lower percentage play than driving it hard to the basket. They were only down one; they didn't need a three to win it.

CoverOrange writes:

in response to johnlg00:

Glad to see that since I couldn't watch it yesterday due to a MAJOR fumble by TWC in my area. Happy to see how much Jarnell was using the backboard yesterday. IMHO, the hardest shot in basketball is the soft jumper in close aimed to go straight in the basket. When you are working as hard physically as you have to do to get off a shot inside, it is just counterintuitive that you will in the same move have the fine touch and judgment to get the ball JUST over the rim. Also, that view of the last play looked more like a foul than it did the first time I saw it. However, it did look like Lacey was trying more to draw the foul than to make the shot, and his exaggerated attempt to make it LOOK like he drew the foul probably discouraged the refs from giving him the call. In any case, I agree with a poster on the main game thread who said that playing for a 3-pointer in that situation was a far lower percentage play than driving it hard to the basket. They were only down one; they didn't need a three to win it.

I think the shooter, realizing time was running down, was trying to create space by moving to the corner not setting up for a 3. He took a step toward the basket, and either Stokes was quick enough not go for the fake or too slow to react to it. Unsuccessful in that, the shooter then waited for Stokes to blow past him to go up for his shot. Stokes didn't blow by but his momentum did carry him past. In bringing the ball up to jump the shooter's arms were extended into Stokes' path. Collision ensued, ball was dropped. I think that because the shooter was bringing the ball up from low on his left to a position in front of him the ref believed he initiated contact. If he had been in the shooting motion (ball over his head and jumping) and Stokes had collided with his arms, would have been a different result. The end court view showed the separation between the shooter and Stokes pretty well, but I only saw that during the broadcast replay.

johnlg00 writes:

in response to CoverOrange:

I think the shooter, realizing time was running down, was trying to create space by moving to the corner not setting up for a 3. He took a step toward the basket, and either Stokes was quick enough not go for the fake or too slow to react to it. Unsuccessful in that, the shooter then waited for Stokes to blow past him to go up for his shot. Stokes didn't blow by but his momentum did carry him past. In bringing the ball up to jump the shooter's arms were extended into Stokes' path. Collision ensued, ball was dropped. I think that because the shooter was bringing the ball up from low on his left to a position in front of him the ref believed he initiated contact. If he had been in the shooting motion (ball over his head and jumping) and Stokes had collided with his arms, would have been a different result. The end court view showed the separation between the shooter and Stokes pretty well, but I only saw that during the broadcast replay.

Makes sense to me. I only saw the view in the highlights from the opposite side of the court. It looked to me like Lacey jumped into Jarnell with his left shoulder, but again I only had that one view. I'm just glad we aren't having to figure this one out after the Vols lost the game.

Want to participate in the conversation? Become a subscriber today. Subscribers can read and comment on any story, anytime. Non-subscribers will only be able to view comments on select stories.

Features