Before arrest, Aaron Hernandez had brushes with violence at Florida

FILE - In this June 26, 2013, file photo, Aaron Hernandez, left, stands with his attorney, Michael Fee, right, during arraignment in Attleboro District Court in Attleboro, Mass. Since Hernandez was arrested last week in the shooting death of a friend whose body was found a mile away from his home, a portrait has emerged of a man whose life away from the field included frequent connections with police-related incidents that started as long ago as his freshman year at the University of Florida. (AP Photo/The Sun Chronicle, Mike George, Pool)

FILE - In this June 26, 2013, file photo, Aaron Hernandez, left, stands with his attorney, Michael Fee, right, during arraignment in Attleboro District Court in Attleboro, Mass. Since Hernandez was arrested last week in the shooting death of a friend whose body was found a mile away from his home, a portrait has emerged of a man whose life away from the field included frequent connections with police-related incidents that started as long ago as his freshman year at the University of Florida. (AP Photo/The Sun Chronicle, Mike George, Pool)

BOSTON (AP) — When Aaron Hernandez first went before a judge to face a murder charge, a defense attorney said the former New England Patriots tight end had never been accused of a violent crime. But Hernandez is apparently no stranger to violence.

Since he was arrested last week in the shooting death of a friend whose body was found a mile away from his home, a portrait has emerged of a man whose life away from the field included frequent connections with police-related incidents that started as long ago as his freshman year at the University of Florida.

An acquaintance who sued Hernandez, claiming he was shot after a fight in a strip club earlier this year. A 2007 bar fight that left a restaurant worker with a burst ear drum. An unsolved double murder at a Boston nightclub last summer. All violent incidents, all with possible ties to the once-dominating athlete who now sits in a private cell for his own protection.

Hernandez has pleaded not guilty in the shooting death of 27-year-old Odin Lloyd, whose body was found June 17 not far from Hernandez's North Attleborough, Mass. mansion. His defense team has called the case circumstantial and has said Hernandez looks forward to clearing his name.

But even before the 23-year-old's recent arrest, public records and interviews show he had been involved in police inquiries in the past, first in Florida and then in the Boston area.

A sworn court complaint from Florida's Eighth Judicial Circuit details Hernandez's apparent involvement in an April 2007 fight at a restaurant called The Swamp in Gainesville, Fla. The partially redacted document says the restaurant worker told police that Hernandez, who was then 17, punched him in the head while he was escorting the subject out of the business after a dispute about an alleged non-payment of a bill.

Tim Tebow, now a member of Patriots and at the time Florida's star quarterback, is listed as a witness. The report said Hernandez asked him to intervene in the verbal dispute before the assault.

The complaint classifies the offense as "felony battery." It wasn't clear Tuesday how the case was resolved.

Also in 2007, Hernandez was among three Florida football players and another who had gone on to the NFL questioned by Gainesville police after a double shooting that happened after a Florida loss. Police said the players provided the information investigators wanted. No charges were ever filed.

A request for comment left with a spokesman for Hernandez's legal team Tuesday evening was not immediately returned.

Although Hernandez is facing a murder charge, his current legal troubles may not end there.

Police in Hernandez's hometown of Bristol, Conn., said Tuesday that Boston police asked for their help with a double homicide investigation linked to the former NFL star.

Bristol Police Lt. Kevin Morrell said the request was based on evidence developed through the investigation of Lloyd's slaying. He said police were asked to search the same home in Bristol for both investigations, and they seized a vehicle at the address Friday.

Two men died in the shooting in Boston's South End on July 15, 2012 and another was wounded. Witnesses reported seeing gunfire coming from a gray SUV with Rhode Island plates. Authorities said 29-year-old Daniel Jorge Correia de Abreu and 28-year-old Safiro Teixeira Furtado were killed, but police didn't identify the third victim.

Boston police have declined to comment on whether Hernandez is being looked as a possible suspect in that case from last summer.

Hernandez has been connected to still more incidents involving guns, although none have resulted in criminal charges against him.

A man who claims Hernandez shot him in the face in February after an argument at a Florida strip club filed a civil lawsuit days before police arrested Hernandez.

Plaintiff Alexander Bradley claims in the civil action that Hernandez shot him with a handgun, causing him to lose his right eye. But after someone found the Connecticut man bleeding in an alley behind a Palm Beach County store after hearing a gunshot, he told police he didn't know who shot him and gave only a vague description of possible assailants.

Bradley's lawyer David Jaroslawicz wouldn't comment on Tuesday about the nature of the alleged dispute between his client and Hernandez. He said the two flew to South Florida together before getting into a dispute at a Miami club.

The attorney said Bradley, who worked for Stanley Steamer before the shooting, had done some work for Hernandez and that the two also hung out socially a few times and had known each other for several years.

"Whether or not Hernandez shot him deliberately or accidentally only Hernandez can tell us and right now he's not doing too much talking," Jaroslawicz said in a phone interview.

Authorities have also linked Hernandez to a May 18 fight outside a bar in Providence, R.I., that involved a gun.

A prosecutor with the Bristol County district attorney's office has said that a man who matched the description of a man seen on video with Hernandez on the night of Lloyd's slaying was seen putting a gun under a car during the Rhode Island incident.

Authorities traced that gun to a Florida gun shop.

Then following Lloyd's death, police said they recovered a .22 caliber gun about a quarter-mile from the defendant's home — a weapon authorities said was traced to the same store.

____

Associated Press writer Michael Melia contributed to this report from Hartford, Conn., and AP writer Kelli Kennedy contributed from Miami, Fla.

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Comments » 81

antonio14313 writes:

you can take the player out of the hood, but ya can't take da hood out of da playa!

guilty until proven innocent (we all know it's supposed to be the other way around, but it's not...)

go vols.

t

Show-me-your-TDs writes:

Fox Sports Is reporting Urban Meyer Rats on his old team for recruiting violations... What a loser!

CrankE writes:

Remember how Urban "The Foreskin" Meyer came unglued on that Orlando reporter for repeating a comment one of his players made about having a real QB now that Tearbow was gone?

Not a word from him about Hernandez.

CrankE writes:

Looks like UF did a great job of covering up any/all thuggery during the time that Meyer winning the Fulmer cup.

It never hurts to have the press in bed with you-as they have been for UF for so many years.

murrayvol writes:

FU has a verrrry large rug.

murrayvol writes:

If Hernandez can avoid prison time (unlikely), he could be in line for President of the Florida Alumni Association.

madrigal writes:

Sounds like he's been trouble for a long time. Yet another example of a kid who got a "pass" over and over just because he happened to be a good athlete. Has nothing to do with school or ethnicity, that is just a common practice for athletes in a lot of places.

richvol writes:

Urban is a scumbag that will do anything,anything to keep a lawbreaker playing. I'll never forget how he let a suspended player come back for the UT game and then went back to suspended status. What a poor example of male leadership and ethics he provides.

trubleoj#657755 writes:

Well I feel safer with him in lockup.....Sounds like a serial killer, possibly 3 murders and at least 2 attempted murders and every detective in 4 states with a random shooting case is salivating. Wonder how many criminology courses he took at FU. Perhaps that is where he got the idea to rent a car to drive the dude a mile from his house to execute (and smash his phone and disable his housecurity after the fact, which achieved nothing by the way). Is he smart enough to keep the gun? Good work FU, Urban and Tim.

MetroplexMojo writes:

in response to richvol:

Urban is a scumbag that will do anything,anything to keep a lawbreaker playing. I'll never forget how he let a suspended player come back for the UT game and then went back to suspended status. What a poor example of male leadership and ethics he provides.

I typed this on an another article but this explains Meyer's character.

When faced with the adversity after realizing Saban and Bama had passed the Gators after waxing them in 2009, this is what he did.

- Cried and moped
- Faked a heart attack
- Quit
- Lied to his family
- Came back
- Let the talented inmates run the asylum
- Quit again after he realized where UF was with no Tebow
- Went to a school in an inferior conference with loaded roster
- Got all the SEC teams off future schedules

CrankE writes:

So . . . . .

. . . if Tearbow intervened in the verbal dispute that escalated into a sucker punch from the A.H. (well, those are his initials), then that places Tearbow at the bar when this event happened.

Strange that Tearbow's personal righteousness didn't actually prevent the AH sucker punch, much less head off the whole under age drinking thing. I'm sure he was maintaining himself pure by drinking milk while out at the bar.

FearTheVols1252 writes:

in response to CrankE:

Looks like UF did a great job of covering up any/all thuggery during the time that Meyer winning the Fulmer cup.

It never hurts to have the press in bed with you-as they have been for UF for so many years.

What’s really mind-boggling is that for as much ‘covering up’ as UM did for players, he still won the Fulmer cup. Makes you wonder just how deep the criminal rabbit hole got at UF under his watch.

I also heard an interesting spin on the radio regarding the Hernandez assault incident while at Florida. Apparently it was handled out of court, but there were some indications from the victim that UF was at the center of that settlement. If UF paid off the victim to avoid any charges being brought up against Hernandez, could that potentially be an NCAA violation if money was exchanged on behalf of a player? Not sure, but I’ll be curious to see if any additional light is shed on that issue. To me it seems like something that could be placed in the ‘improper benefits’ category since the lawsuit would have involved a player rather than the university, but I’m not a lawyer, nor do I work for the NCAA… so I don’t know for sure.

CrankE writes:

in response to MetroplexMojo:

I typed this on an another article but this explains Meyer's character.

When faced with the adversity after realizing Saban and Bama had passed the Gators after waxing them in 2009, this is what he did.

- Cried and moped
- Faked a heart attack
- Quit
- Lied to his family
- Came back
- Let the talented inmates run the asylum
- Quit again after he realized where UF was with no Tebow
- Went to a school in an inferior conference with loaded roster
- Got all the SEC teams off future schedules

...and will do it all again at THE Ohio State University where President Gordon Gee is his employee.

Oh, and who can forget the whole "swine flu" excuse after the win over Tennessee in 2009!

You can't spell FLU without UF.

volboy81 writes:

Theres no telling how many times Urban Meyer covered up his activities in Gaynesville while he was there. The more I hear about Meyer, the less I think of him, which wasnt much to begin with. I think he would probably do just about anything to make sure he gets a W on Saturdays.
This is a prime example of someone (Meyer, Hernandez's parents, etc.) not doing their job.

bUTch_please writes:

in response to FearTheVols1252:

What’s really mind-boggling is that for as much ‘covering up’ as UM did for players, he still won the Fulmer cup. Makes you wonder just how deep the criminal rabbit hole got at UF under his watch.

I also heard an interesting spin on the radio regarding the Hernandez assault incident while at Florida. Apparently it was handled out of court, but there were some indications from the victim that UF was at the center of that settlement. If UF paid off the victim to avoid any charges being brought up against Hernandez, could that potentially be an NCAA violation if money was exchanged on behalf of a player? Not sure, but I’ll be curious to see if any additional light is shed on that issue. To me it seems like something that could be placed in the ‘improper benefits’ category since the lawsuit would have involved a player rather than the university, but I’m not a lawyer, nor do I work for the NCAA… so I don’t know for sure.

Hmm, true this. Major violation. Unreported for 3-4 years? Belly crawlers better hope like **** that this isn't true.

gohawks1 writes:

Go gatas! Go gatas! Go gatas! Sheesh...

MetroplexMojo writes:

in response to FearTheVols1252:

What’s really mind-boggling is that for as much ‘covering up’ as UM did for players, he still won the Fulmer cup. Makes you wonder just how deep the criminal rabbit hole got at UF under his watch.

I also heard an interesting spin on the radio regarding the Hernandez assault incident while at Florida. Apparently it was handled out of court, but there were some indications from the victim that UF was at the center of that settlement. If UF paid off the victim to avoid any charges being brought up against Hernandez, could that potentially be an NCAA violation if money was exchanged on behalf of a player? Not sure, but I’ll be curious to see if any additional light is shed on that issue. To me it seems like something that could be placed in the ‘improper benefits’ category since the lawsuit would have involved a player rather than the university, but I’m not a lawyer, nor do I work for the NCAA… so I don’t know for sure.

Have a hard time believing this is true. While Hernandez was a great player, the type of situation described would get Florida the death penalty if they paid off the victim. Hernandez wouldn't have been worth that type of risk.

8inarow writes:

Unlike Vols fans who still back multiple players who have driven over people in DUI Homicide cases, I will not support Hernandez if he is in fact guilty of these crimes.

8inarow writes:

in response to bUTch_please:

Hmm, true this. Major violation. Unreported for 3-4 years? Belly crawlers better hope like **** that this isn't true.

And I heard that he Vols would finish above .500 this year, but we all know that isn't true either.

See how that works?

lemme_axya_this writes:

in response to 8inarow:

Unlike Vols fans who still back multiple players who have driven over people in DUI Homicide cases, I will not support Hernandez if he is in fact guilty of these crimes.

Watch your step, he may have killed for less. I'm glad this isn't playing out in Florida, you people couldn't even convict Casey Anthony.

utvolfan1955 writes:

in response to 8inarow:

And I heard that he Vols would finish above .500 this year, but we all know that isn't true either.

See how that works?

I heard that you are a pot stirring troll piece. that's how it works

usafvol writes:

in response to lemme_axya_this:

Watch your step, he may have killed for less. I'm glad this isn't playing out in Florida, you people couldn't even convict Casey Anthony.

Or get the vote count correct during the presidential election a few years ago. They do however know all there is to know regarding flip flops, tank tops and Walmarts..

8inarow writes:

I noticed how you girls are hiding from my first post, shoe fits, doesn't it?

ancientvolfan2 writes:

in response to 8inarow:

Unlike Vols fans who still back multiple players who have driven over people in DUI Homicide cases, I will not support Hernandez if he is in fact guilty of these crimes.

Not all Vol fans are alike, of course. But do you really not see a difference between a DUI and pre-meditated murder? The law does. I believe those former Vols received some form of punishment.

johnlg00 writes:

in response to madrigal:

Sounds like he's been trouble for a long time. Yet another example of a kid who got a "pass" over and over just because he happened to be a good athlete. Has nothing to do with school or ethnicity, that is just a common practice for athletes in a lot of places.

Very true. It is sometimes hard to distinguish between a basically good kid who might do something wrong under the influence of bad companions and one who IS one of those bad companions. It is more important than ever that college teams do their homework on what kind of people they are recruiting. Local communities do their own enabling if a guy is a big star from an early age. A certain amount of teenage irresponsibility is one thing; a determination to live the "thug life" is quite another.

FearTheVols1252 writes:

in response to 8inarow:

Unlike Vols fans who still back multiple players who have driven over people in DUI Homicide cases, I will not support Hernandez if he is in fact guilty of these crimes.

Congrats on your willingness not to support someone if convicted of first degree murder. Very noble of you. Do you want a medal or something?

FearTheVols1252 writes:

in response to MetroplexMojo:

Have a hard time believing this is true. While Hernandez was a great player, the type of situation described would get Florida the death penalty if they paid off the victim. Hernandez wouldn't have been worth that type of risk.

It's neither been confirmed nor denied. However, there certainly seems to be at least enough dirt to warrant an investigation.

http://www.usatoday.com/story/sports/...

johnlg00 writes:

in response to CrankE:

...and will do it all again at THE Ohio State University where President Gordon Gee is his employee.

Oh, and who can forget the whole "swine flu" excuse after the win over Tennessee in 2009!

You can't spell FLU without UF.

I don't know if he is actually gone yet or not, but Dr. Gee recently resigned as OSU president after putting his foot in his mouth a few too many times, and no doubt in part for basically standing by while the whole Tressel thing went down. The next guy will not have any special allegiance to Meyer, so I expect him and his staff to be on the straight-and-narrow for awhile. Even the most rabid OSU boosters must be feeling a little "scandal fatigue" by now.

johnlg00 writes:

in response to 8inarow:

I noticed how you girls are hiding from my first post, shoe fits, doesn't it?

We saw your first post and every other stupid, annoying, pointless, tasteless post you have ever made. Now imagine the gesture I am making in your direction. That's all the response any of your posts deserve.

lemme_axya_this writes:

in response to MetroplexMojo:

Have a hard time believing this is true. While Hernandez was a great player, the type of situation described would get Florida the death penalty if they paid off the victim. Hernandez wouldn't have been worth that type of risk.

They may both get the death penalty then.

8inarow writes:

in response to johnlg00:

We saw your first post and every other stupid, annoying, pointless, tasteless post you have ever made. Now imagine the gesture I am making in your direction. That's all the response any of your posts deserve.

Excellent. I am pleased that I was able to get under you skin with such skillful precision.

MetroplexMojo writes:

As someone who nearly lost a leg to a drunk driver 15 years ago, the penalties for drunk driving are ridiculously light. Leonard Little should still be in jail. Stallworth should be as well. Their complete lack of judgment cost an individual their life and their punishments were a joke. As bad as drunk driving is, there are some major differences between Hernandez and Little/Stallworth.

1. Hernandez is being charged with premeditated murder. His intent was to execute the victim. Little/Stallworth were grossly and criminally negligent but did not intend on executing their victims.

2. Counting Hernandez's failed drug tests, he was involved in nearly one dozen incidents at Florida where the coaching staff declined to suspend him. To my knowledge, neither Little nor Stallworth were charged with anything while at UTK.

8inarow writes:

in response to johnlg00:

I don't know if he is actually gone yet or not, but Dr. Gee recently resigned as OSU president after putting his foot in his mouth a few too many times, and no doubt in part for basically standing by while the whole Tressel thing went down. The next guy will not have any special allegiance to Meyer, so I expect him and his staff to be on the straight-and-narrow for awhile. Even the most rabid OSU boosters must be feeling a little "scandal fatigue" by now.

Was that 5 in a row, or 6 in a row? I am losing track anymore.

8inarow writes:

in response to MetroplexMojo:

As someone who nearly lost a leg to a drunk driver 15 years ago, the penalties for drunk driving are ridiculously light. Leonard Little should still be in jail. Stallworth should be as well. Their complete lack of judgment cost an individual their life and their punishments were a joke. As bad as drunk driving is, there are some major differences between Hernandez and Little/Stallworth.

1. Hernandez is being charged with premeditated murder. His intent was to execute the victim. Little/Stallworth were grossly and criminally negligent but did not intend on executing their victims.

2. Counting Hernandez's failed drug tests, he was involved in nearly one dozen incidents at Florida where the coaching staff declined to suspend him. To my knowledge, neither Little nor Stallworth were charged with anything while at UTK.

1. You don't know that about Little or Stallworth. Both victim families paid off.

2. Please provide a link for this information.

Thanks

lemme_axya_this writes:

in response to 8inarow:

Was that 5 in a row, or 6 in a row? I am losing track anymore.

I can just hear Hernandez asking the guys in his cell block the same question.

johnlg00 writes:

in response to 8inarow:

Excellent. I am pleased that I was able to get under you skin with such skillful precision.

It really doesn't take that much concentration on my part to flick a mosquito or flip a bird to a troll.

CrankE writes:

in response to MetroplexMojo:

Have a hard time believing this is true. While Hernandez was a great player, the type of situation described would get Florida the death penalty if they paid off the victim. Hernandez wouldn't have been worth that type of risk.

Except that the NCQAA (also known as the Boneless Chicken Ranch of Far Side fame) will never hand out the death penalty to anybody again.

Look, if Miami didn't get it in the 1990s, if Alabama didn't get it for their repeated violations in the early-mid 2000s, then nobody is.

What will happen is that new sanctions will be announced against anyone who points out any unpleasant truth about any current, former, or future coach, player, trainer, or student at UF. Mike Slive will lead the way.

bUTch_please writes:

in response to MetroplexMojo:

Have a hard time believing this is true. While Hernandez was a great player, the type of situation described would get Florida the death penalty if they paid off the victim. Hernandez wouldn't have been worth that type of risk.

Seriously, right?

There is no way FU would do that. I mean, think of the mindset involved before that could happen. First, they would have to think that by running the settlement outside of the athletic department that it would just lose visibility. Second, they would have to think that Slive would provide cover from the 2A, Third, Meyer would have to think he was untouchable, invincible and........

....wait a minute.

MetroplexMojo writes:

in response to 8inarow:

1. You don't know that about Little or Stallworth. Both victim families paid off.

2. Please provide a link for this information.

Thanks

Two links on Hernandez failing mulitple drug tests. You combine that with the fight and being questioned in other events, the total is close to a dozen.

Little and Stallworth paid the families off because their actions caused the deaths of their relatives. They paid them off because a civil trial would have resulted in millions of dollars of restitution.

http://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com/...

http://nesn.com/2013/06/florida-athle...

CrankE writes:

in response to 8inarow:

Unlike Vols fans who still back multiple players who have driven over people in DUI Homicide cases, I will not support Hernandez if he is in fact guilty of these crimes.

But until a jury convicts him, you're behind the AH 100%. Glad we got that settled.

Now go back to looking for "the real killers", OJ.

8inarow writes:

The University of Florida follows its drug-testing policies,” Foley said. “We do not deviate from our drug-testing policies for anyone. We never have, and we never will.” Foley’s No. 2, Steve McClain, who is Florida’s senior associate AD, seconded that story, saying outright ”I would go on record saying he didn’t fail six drug tests [at Florida].

8inarow writes:

in response to MetroplexMojo:

Two links on Hernandez failing mulitple drug tests. You combine that with the fight and being questioned in other events, the total is close to a dozen.

Little and Stallworth paid the families off because their actions caused the deaths of their relatives. They paid them off because a civil trial would have resulted in millions of dollars of restitution.

http://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com/...

http://nesn.com/2013/06/florida-athle...

Posted by NBC Sports on April 26, 2010, 9:38 PM EDT

A. Hernandez.jpgOnce thought to be a borderline first-round talent, Florida tight end Aaron Hernandez fell to New England at pick No. 113 in the draft. Now we may know why.

Do you always use up-to-date links to stories that were debunked 3-years ago?

8inarow writes:

in response to CrankE:

But until a jury convicts him, you're behind the AH 100%. Glad we got that settled.

Now go back to looking for "the real killers", OJ.

Akhmed, I didn't say that. I think I will follow the justice system still in effect (unless Hussein Obama has gutted this as well), that a person is innocent until a court of law changes that status.

So, I am going to stay out of his guilty until proven innocent position that Vols are taking.

MetroplexMojo writes:

in response to 8inarow:

Posted by NBC Sports on April 26, 2010, 9:38 PM EDT

A. Hernandez.jpgOnce thought to be a borderline first-round talent, Florida tight end Aaron Hernandez fell to New England at pick No. 113 in the draft. Now we may know why.

Do you always use up-to-date links to stories that were debunked 3-years ago?

Actually, I used the first two links I saw. There was approximately 125,000 that I could have chose from.

The Bengals, who have taken chances on dozens of players with character risks, took Hernandez off their draft board. Hernandez was a top 15 talent yet fell to the 4th round and was taken off the draft board of most NFL teams. That should be enough proof there. We can argue about the number of issues but we both know it's a significant number (Who knows, it may be 8). Any way you slice it, most NFL teams realized Hernandez was not worth the risk(The same logic applies to T Bray and Da'Rick so you won't accuse me of cherry picking). Hernandez (like Da'Rick and the Honey Badger) got numerous chances because they were good players. The only difference was Da'Rick and the Honey Badger eventually got kicked off the team.

A legitimate question for you: Would Hernandez be in jail now if the Florida coaching staff punished him more for his actions while at UF?

http://www.cbssports.com/nfl/blog/eye...

antonio14313 writes:

in response to 8inarow:

Akhmed, I didn't say that. I think I will follow the justice system still in effect (unless Hussein Obama has gutted this as well), that a person is innocent until a court of law changes that status.

So, I am going to stay out of his guilty until proven innocent position that Vols are taking.

...Vols aren't the only ones that presume guilt before being proven innocent, whether it be in a court of law, or anywhere else for that matter. ALL OF SOCIETY, or at least all americans, think guilty before being proven innocent. it's not the way it should be, and it's not the way it's supposed to be, but that's just the way it is.

and besides, look at ALL that evidence against your boy, hernandez. i don't see him getting out of it...

go vols.

t

MetroplexMojo writes:

in response to CrankE:

Except that the NCQAA (also known as the Boneless Chicken Ranch of Far Side fame) will never hand out the death penalty to anybody again.

Look, if Miami didn't get it in the 1990s, if Alabama didn't get it for their repeated violations in the early-mid 2000s, then nobody is.

What will happen is that new sanctions will be announced against anyone who points out any unpleasant truth about any current, former, or future coach, player, trainer, or student at UF. Mike Slive will lead the way.

Crank/Fear/Lemme/bUTch Please (I'm too lazy to respond to everyone so here's my global response to you 4),

Hernandez had not played a down when he got in that fight. I don't think UF would be dumb enough to pay off the victim for a kid that hasn't played yet. If UF did that, they would have covered up a police investigation (Penn State) and used university funds to pay off the victim and providing a benefit to a player (SMU). I'm sure the university used whatever persuasive force it could on the police department to minimize the impact. It wouldn't shock me if a booster worked things out with the victim (a NCAA violation but now out of statute). However, I see no way in which the university paid him off unless the bar was on campus or was hosting a university event at the time. I don't think Foley is that stupid.

abnerPeabody writes:

in response to 8inarow:

And I heard that he Vols would finish above .500 this year, but we all know that isn't true either.

See how that works?

You are no better than the accused.You are both thugs.

123forVOLS writes:

I am just so glad no one put Meyers on here for Urban Meyer. Aw shucks, I just did. It will all come out in the end but you chuckers keep on wasting time and posts. You must have some sad sad sad lives.

TeamXer writes:

in response to 8inarow:

I noticed how you girls are hiding from my first post, shoe fits, doesn't it?

I never seen anybody defending Dwayne Goodrich's DUI. Goodrich's actions were inexcusasble. Even as a Vols fan, I thought Little got off easy.
Stallworth, on the other hand, pleaded guilty, against his lawyers advice, so that then dead man's family would not have to endure a trial.
8 in a row? Regardless of the results of the games, I'd never want to trade places with a Gators fan.
Go Vols

Tau_of_Tennessee writes:

Looks like those handcuffs could hamper the gator chomps.

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