Erik Ainge DUI case reset to Aug. 6

Tennessee quarterback Erik Ainge celebrates with the crowd after a 52-50 win over Kentucky in four overtimes on November 24, 2007. Ainge is on the hit list to participate in 'Dancing With the Knoxville Stars.'

Photo by Amy Smotherman Burgess

Tennessee quarterback Erik Ainge celebrates with the crowd after a 52-50 win over Kentucky in four overtimes on November 24, 2007. Ainge is on the hit list to participate in "Dancing With the Knoxville Stars."

KNOXVILLE — The DUI case for former University of Tennessee quarterback Erik Ainge is set now for Aug. 6 in Knox County General Sessions Court.

The case had been on the docket as a routine matter Monday and was reset to next week.

Also Monday, Ainge released a statement to the News Sentinel and other media outlets.

"I have always been completely transparent about my professional and personal life. I've been an open book about my past struggles. This situation is no different. When the time is right I will explain exactly what happened, but right now I have to let the legal issues play out."

Ainge was arrested early Sunday on the driving under the influence charge.

An officer spotted him in a 2014 GMC Sierra at 1:13 a.m. allegedly swerving in and out of the middle lane of traffic on Interstate 40 West near the West Hills exit, according to Knoxville Police Department spokesman Darrell DeBusk.

Ainge, 27, allegedly had dilated pupils and slurred speech, and failed field sobriety tests, according to the arrest warrant. He was arrested on charges of driving under the influence, violating the implied consent law and a roadway lane violation.

After his arrest, Ainge refused to submit to a blood test, the arrest warrant states.

Ainge was booked into the Knox County Detention Facility and released later Sunday on a $500 appearance bond.

He started 37 games at quarterback from 2004-07, leading the Vols to an Outback Bowl victory over Wisconsin in his final collegiate game.

He was selected by the New York Jets in the fifth round of the 2008 NFL draft. His appearances in three seasons were limited to exhibition games before he retired due to injuries.

Ainge was suspended for violating the NFL’s substance abuse policy during his rookie season and later entered a drug treatment center. He has spoken openly of his battle against drug and alcohol addiction.

In March 2011, Ainge detailed his struggles with addiction in a first-person account published by ESPNNewYork.com.

The former quarterback credited Narcotics Anonymous and Alcoholics Anonymous with helping him in his recovery.

The Portland, Ore., native returned to Tennessee after he left the NFL. He now hosts “The Erik Ainge Show” on Tennessee Sports

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Comments » 14

keepitreal4vols writes:

Guilty until proven innocent? This story is on Yahoo sports, National sports blogs, twitter, facebook, etc. If he is found not guilty, Erik Ainge will hit the jackpot lawsuit.

southernbelle79 writes:

I heard on TV that he maintains he wasn't drunk, but rather was texting while driving.

Translation: I wasn't doing something incredibly stupid and illegal, I was doing something incredibly stupid and illegal.

No wonder his lawyer told him to stop talking.

whoyagonnacall writes:

Who gives a sh**?
A lot people played ball at UT in the past.
That doesn't make them newsworthy today.

whoyagonnacall writes:

in response to keepitreal4vols:

Guilty until proven innocent? This story is on Yahoo sports, National sports blogs, twitter, facebook, etc. If he is found not guilty, Erik Ainge will hit the jackpot lawsuit.

Nope.
No "lawsuit jackpot".
In Tennessee,when you are stopped on suspicion of DUI, and his driving,or lack thereof,is probable cause. And his driving is on digital video.
When he refused to take any tests (blood,breath,fst's), he decided to open himself up to the implied consent law. When you sign for your Tn license, you are saying that you understand the Implied Consent Law and that you accept the penalty.
There's no way around it.
You're saying you won't take any kind of test because you know you can't pass a test because you know you're intoxicated.
The Officer charged him with that, so the Officer is protected from a civil lawsuit.
And on his criminal history and driving charge history, Implied Consent is as good as DUI for insurance companies and any job that would require you to drive.

aspenvol2 writes:

Still can't forgive the pick 6 against LSU while leading in the 4th qtr of the SECC. Senior qb used bad judgment. Still does.

commonman writes:

Wow, if he still played for Ut the cops would have gave him a ride home!

Henley-Street-Bridge writes:

Texting does not give you dilated pupils though. Marijuana, among things, can give you dilated pupils along with speech patterns like that.

Most dependency addicts never can stop; they simply switch addictions; you have to go to the roots of their problem, which is Codependence nearly every time.

licknpromise777#651578 writes:

in response to whoyagonnacall:

Nope.
No "lawsuit jackpot".
In Tennessee,when you are stopped on suspicion of DUI, and his driving,or lack thereof,is probable cause. And his driving is on digital video.
When he refused to take any tests (blood,breath,fst's), he decided to open himself up to the implied consent law. When you sign for your Tn license, you are saying that you understand the Implied Consent Law and that you accept the penalty.
There's no way around it.
You're saying you won't take any kind of test because you know you can't pass a test because you know you're intoxicated.
The Officer charged him with that, so the Officer is protected from a civil lawsuit.
And on his criminal history and driving charge history, Implied Consent is as good as DUI for insurance companies and any job that would require you to drive.

Partially right..You absolutely do not have to take a field sobriety test and if you are stupid enough to do so all you are doing is proving guilt for a prosecutor. About 15% of stone cold sober people can not pass all 3 tests and police know it!!! ALL; I repeat!! All traffic stops except for speed traps are basically DUI check points used at police discretion. NEVER: EVER answer yes if asked have you been drinking!!!! Saying yes is a total admission to DUI and you are going to jail..Everything that happens after you exit the car is only used to prove guilt. You also do not have to blow into a portable breathalyzer and should refuse to if you have touched a drink at all that day. However like you said at some point you must decide to submit or not submit to a calibrated breathalyzer or blood test or face a DL suspension..Most all defense lawyers would tell you not to take the test unless of course you have not consumed alcohol. It amazes me that people believe they can avoid jail by taking a FS Test.Once you answer yes I had a drink your dead in the water.

StoneJackBaller writes:

The guy is a recovering alcoholic and drug addict. Everyone knows this. While it is not good, it comes as no surprise that he was arrested for DUI. He has a young family and is a proud dad. I believe he will learn from this mistake and luckily no one got hurt.

GONAVY writes:

in response to StoneJackBaller:

The guy is a recovering alcoholic and drug addict. Everyone knows this. While it is not good, it comes as no surprise that he was arrested for DUI. He has a young family and is a proud dad. I believe he will learn from this mistake and luckily no one got hurt.

well said...no one hurts more today than Ainge...

Pompey writes:

...the scary thing is that recovery does not always work....!

Chappy writes:

Even people in recovery slip from time to time. Substance abuse and addiction are demons that never go away, some days they're just more manageable than others.

Best wishes and good luck Erik.

mac_b_from_tn writes:

in response to keepitreal4vols:

Guilty until proven innocent? This story is on Yahoo sports, National sports blogs, twitter, facebook, etc. If he is found not guilty, Erik Ainge will hit the jackpot lawsuit.

No matter the outcome of the legal proceedings, he was placed under arrest for suspicion of DUI and violation of implied consent. That is an indisputable fact.

Please explain how you think he can he successfully sue anyone for reporting an indisputable fact?

ProfessionalHandicapper writes:

He without sin cast the first stone. Wish him well and if he slipped I hope he regains control of his life.

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