Rotations on defense will be harder for Tennessee against Oregon's up-tempo offense

Oregon makes it tough to rotate out personnel

ADAM LAU/NEWS SENTINEL
Tennessee defensive lineman Daniel McCullers pressures Western Kentucky quarterback Brandon Doughty at Neyland Stadium on Saturday. McCullers and the rest of the Vols will have to deal with Oregon’s fast-paced offense, which will make it difficult to rotate players out on defense.

Photo by Adam Lau

ADAM LAU/NEWS SENTINEL Tennessee defensive lineman Daniel McCullers pressures Western Kentucky quarterback Brandon Doughty at Neyland Stadium on Saturday. McCullers and the rest of the Vols will have to deal with Oregon’s fast-paced offense, which will make it difficult to rotate players out on defense.

When defensive back JaRon Toney enters, linebacker Brent Brewer departs.

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Comments » 5

johnlg00 writes:

Sometimes, an old guy like me who remembers one-platoon football wonders if today's players might somehow not be as well-conditioned as they used to be. Players are of course much bigger and stronger than they used to be, and big guys are generally much faster than their predecessors. It may also be that coaches then more or less accepted the fact that guys couldn't go 100% all the time, even though they used the same "all-out" rhetoric as today's coaches do. In one-platoon football, guys were essentially trained to go, say, 80% all day rather than 100% on a couple of plays and then coming out.

It may be that something has been lost in the perhaps too-early specialization of modern players. When I was a kid, we played active sports and games from dawn to dusk, perhaps swapping out sports during the different seasons but always going pretty hard all day. I don't think kids grow up doing that as much these days. Recent physiological research shows that vigorous exercise and good nutrition begun as early in life as possible builds strong bones and muscles that give people a life-long advantage in fitness and health. Also, I don't think kids drink as much milk as they used to, so their bones may lack a certain tensile strength as they get older. Anyone who has read Pat Summit's latest book knows there is a reason why "country-strong" is a meaningful expression, to which today's mostly city-raised kids cannot relate.

Of course, this may all just be the mutterings of an old man who perhaps remembers the past as better than it was. I know I envy today's players for the better strength and conditioning techniques and facilities they have compared to what we had. I also know I have great admiration for all the time and energy they expend in the course of their college careers, even though I think they miss out on much of life's splendid variety while doing so.

wigmeister writes:

Speed kills. We need to give them some of their own medicine. The offense has to succeed to give our defense time to rest, or it will be a long day.

wigmeister writes:

in response to johnlg00:

Sometimes, an old guy like me who remembers one-platoon football wonders if today's players might somehow not be as well-conditioned as they used to be. Players are of course much bigger and stronger than they used to be, and big guys are generally much faster than their predecessors. It may also be that coaches then more or less accepted the fact that guys couldn't go 100% all the time, even though they used the same "all-out" rhetoric as today's coaches do. In one-platoon football, guys were essentially trained to go, say, 80% all day rather than 100% on a couple of plays and then coming out.

It may be that something has been lost in the perhaps too-early specialization of modern players. When I was a kid, we played active sports and games from dawn to dusk, perhaps swapping out sports during the different seasons but always going pretty hard all day. I don't think kids grow up doing that as much these days. Recent physiological research shows that vigorous exercise and good nutrition begun as early in life as possible builds strong bones and muscles that give people a life-long advantage in fitness and health. Also, I don't think kids drink as much milk as they used to, so their bones may lack a certain tensile strength as they get older. Anyone who has read Pat Summit's latest book knows there is a reason why "country-strong" is a meaningful expression, to which today's mostly city-raised kids cannot relate.

Of course, this may all just be the mutterings of an old man who perhaps remembers the past as better than it was. I know I envy today's players for the better strength and conditioning techniques and facilities they have compared to what we had. I also know I have great admiration for all the time and energy they expend in the course of their college careers, even though I think they miss out on much of life's splendid variety while doing so.

Excellent post, from another old guy!

Alpha-Snail writes:

in response to johnlg00:

Sometimes, an old guy like me who remembers one-platoon football wonders if today's players might somehow not be as well-conditioned as they used to be. Players are of course much bigger and stronger than they used to be, and big guys are generally much faster than their predecessors. It may also be that coaches then more or less accepted the fact that guys couldn't go 100% all the time, even though they used the same "all-out" rhetoric as today's coaches do. In one-platoon football, guys were essentially trained to go, say, 80% all day rather than 100% on a couple of plays and then coming out.

It may be that something has been lost in the perhaps too-early specialization of modern players. When I was a kid, we played active sports and games from dawn to dusk, perhaps swapping out sports during the different seasons but always going pretty hard all day. I don't think kids grow up doing that as much these days. Recent physiological research shows that vigorous exercise and good nutrition begun as early in life as possible builds strong bones and muscles that give people a life-long advantage in fitness and health. Also, I don't think kids drink as much milk as they used to, so their bones may lack a certain tensile strength as they get older. Anyone who has read Pat Summit's latest book knows there is a reason why "country-strong" is a meaningful expression, to which today's mostly city-raised kids cannot relate.

Of course, this may all just be the mutterings of an old man who perhaps remembers the past as better than it was. I know I envy today's players for the better strength and conditioning techniques and facilities they have compared to what we had. I also know I have great admiration for all the time and energy they expend in the course of their college careers, even though I think they miss out on much of life's splendid variety while doing so.

Your comments were very well thought out and nicely written. Enjoyed it very much. Thanks.

johnlg00 writes:

Thanks to wigmeister and Alpha-Snail for the kind comments. Sometimes I get on a favorite hobby-horse and the darned thing runs away with me! Feel free to let me know--nicely, I hope!--if I get too much out of hand.

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