John Adams: Peyton Manning's popularity transcends teams

John Adams
news sentinel
Peyton Manning, right, signs autographs for fans in 2012 after Peyton Manning Pass was dedicated at the University of Tennessee.

Photo by Chad Greene

news sentinel Peyton Manning, right, signs autographs for fans in 2012 after Peyton Manning Pass was dedicated at the University of Tennessee.

All I had to ask was, “How are you?”

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Comments » 6

mostrevd#1340221 writes:

What's not to like about Peyton Manning. He is the class of the NFL just like Jack Nicklaus was the class of the PGA for 30 years. And it's not just their athletic ability. It's the way that they treat the public and the demeanor in which they conduct their selves. You can say what you want about Tiger Woods, but until he gets a little humility and conducts himself better on the course, he will never be the equal of Jack, not as a man or a golfer.

Tao_of_Tennessee writes:

Nice piece and well said, Adams.

johnlg00 writes:

Being able to claim Peyton as one of our own and him claiming all of us right back is one of the more satisfying aspects of being a UT fan. It would be a horrible comedown if Peyton were ever to come across as a jerk after all he has done for others who have been less fortunate. At times, he seems almost too good to be true, but as extensively as he is covered across the whole country and all the media, I think we would have heard about it by now if Peyton were not actually the "prince" he seems to be. I know I will be pulling as hard I can for him tonight and I'm sure all the rest of Big Orange Country will, too!

AtomicVol writes:

Great piece, Go Vols and Peyton

Chris_L75 writes:

I like him too, but I fear tonight's game has cemented his rep as the one-man Atlanta Braves of football: Steamroll through regular season, and then...something...just happens. Very dispiriting.

Of course several things went wrong that he did not control (bad snap, arm hit on 2nd INT, kickoff return). But we all know that's not what ESPN will be hammering into the ground all day Monday. How much of it is because of the connection to UT, which they hold in sneering contempt, is perhaps uncertain. But at a time when Vol fans could use a boost to the "brand," this game has provided the opposite.

johnlg00 writes:

in response to Chris_L75:

I like him too, but I fear tonight's game has cemented his rep as the one-man Atlanta Braves of football: Steamroll through regular season, and then...something...just happens. Very dispiriting.

Of course several things went wrong that he did not control (bad snap, arm hit on 2nd INT, kickoff return). But we all know that's not what ESPN will be hammering into the ground all day Monday. How much of it is because of the connection to UT, which they hold in sneering contempt, is perhaps uncertain. But at a time when Vol fans could use a boost to the "brand," this game has provided the opposite.

Yeah, there might be some of that, in some quarters, but I don't think it will extend to the ESPN corporate spin on the game or Peyton's legacy. Since ESPN is involved in the NFL, it would hardly do for them to go all negative on him after breathlessly covering all his record-setting exploits all season. Even before the game, a majority of commentators I heard on various networks said that even if he lost and never made it to another Super Bowl, Peyton's place among the very best that have ever played the game will be secure.

On a somewhat more uplifting note, there was an article on the Yahoo! home page by veteran sportswriter Doug Wetzel which told of how, after enduring all the disappointment, meeting with the media, and answering all questions honestly, he came back out into the corridors beneath the stadium to sign autographs for a crowd of people who included some of the stadium support staff. When he passed by one group on the way to the interview room, a man asked him for an autograph. A fair-sized crowd was pushing him and it was time for his media session, so Peyton told the guy that he couldn't do it now, but he would if the guy could wait until after he met the media. He did come back and signed autographs for nearly an hour on one of the worst nights of his life. It says much for him that fans would still WANT his autograph after a game like that, judged him as the kind of man who WOULD sign an autograph after all that, and that he would take this time for them when all he or any other person in his place probably wanted to do was to just sneak away and cover his head. IMHO, Peyton's "brand" has far transcended mere sports and cannot be diminished by any single game result.

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