John Adams: Competition already heating up with UT recruits

John Adams
Tennessee midterm signees, from left, Daniel Helm (80), Neiko Creamer (82), Josh Malone (3), Von Pearson (9), Emmanuel Moseley (12), Dontavius Blair (74) , Owen Williams (58), Ethan Wolf (88), D'Andre Payne (2), Coleman Thomas (55), Dimarya Mixon (40), Jalen Hurd (1), Jakob Johnson (44), and Ray Raulerson (64) have their photo take with head coach Butch Jones at Neyland Stadium on Wednesday, February 5, 2014. 
  
 (SAUL YOUNG/NEWS SENTINEL)

Photo by Saul Young, 2014 Knoxville News Sentinel

Tennessee midterm signees, from left, Daniel Helm (80), Neiko Creamer (82), Josh Malone (3), Von Pearson (9), Emmanuel Moseley (12), Dontavius Blair (74) , Owen Williams (58), Ethan Wolf (88), D'Andre Payne (2), Coleman Thomas (55), Dimarya Mixon (40), Jalen Hurd (1), Jakob Johnson (44), and Ray Raulerson (64) have their photo take with head coach Butch Jones at Neyland Stadium on Wednesday, February 5, 2014. (SAUL YOUNG/NEWS SENTINEL)

Tennessee’s 2014 football recruiting class won’t have to wait until preseason camp — or even this spring — to assert itself.

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Comments » 11

atnvol#283282 writes:

Can't wait for spring practice...

oldster writes:

Had a team mate once, who gave lie to this premise. He was the quietest, self contained person I have ever known. When we had drills, he rarely seemed to be competing with anyone but himself. In scrimmages and games, though, you really did not want to be the guy on the other team with the ball or the opponent between him and the ball. He was the most vicious football player I have ever seen. The best description I can think of is a killer in a football helmet. He was not really competitive, he just wanted to hurt someone. Glad he was on my team.

vut5686#1405392 writes:

After Oklahoma or Alabama, John will probably write, "They must have left their juice at the breakfast table." Practice should determine who plays....the first game. After that, what happens on Saturday is about all that really matters....and what should determine who plays.

johnlg00 writes:

Interesting to hear. A wise man once said, "Nothing great in life is ever achieved without enthusiasm." One characteristic of many modern athletes that drives coaches crazy is the prevalence of the "cool pose", the attitude that there is nothing new or exciting in life, that one has seen or done it all, no matter how young and inexperienced in life one actually may be. Doesn't seem to be much of that in this class, which can only be a good sign going forward. These guys seem to be fired up right now. Let's hope they can keep it going to the point where it is a defining characteristic of the program.

johnlg00 writes:

in response to vut5686#1405392:

After Oklahoma or Alabama, John will probably write, "They must have left their juice at the breakfast table." Practice should determine who plays....the first game. After that, what happens on Saturday is about all that really matters....and what should determine who plays.

I'm not sure that idea works all that well in football, except perhaps for some free-spirited kick returner or wide receiver. Most of game action for most players consists of constantly repeating a limited series of rote motions which absolutely must be coordinated with everybody else on the team. The repetition of practice is the only way that kind of precision and consistency. If you have prima-donnas running around with the idea that they can loaf in practice and still play, it is poisonous to a whole team. Sure, there are great players out there who can play completely spontaneously, but everybody else NEEDS the practice repetitions, and I just think a coach plays with fire if he is perceived to be taking it easy in practice on "favorite" guys.

c9bcc writes:

Being competitive is good, but are the competitive as a team. Are they trying to make everyone else better?

wallace.kelley#1426051 writes:

in response to johnlg00:

Interesting to hear. A wise man once said, "Nothing great in life is ever achieved without enthusiasm." One characteristic of many modern athletes that drives coaches crazy is the prevalence of the "cool pose", the attitude that there is nothing new or exciting in life, that one has seen or done it all, no matter how young and inexperienced in life one actually may be. Doesn't seem to be much of that in this class, which can only be a good sign going forward. These guys seem to be fired up right now. Let's hope they can keep it going to the point where it is a defining characteristic of the program.

I don't know about that. Too cool for the room worked out pretty well for the great Jim Brown. His attitude was don't get too excited because he didn't want anyone to think he was new to the Rodeo.

johnlg00 writes:

in response to wallace.kelley#1426051:

I don't know about that. Too cool for the room worked out pretty well for the great Jim Brown. His attitude was don't get too excited because he didn't want anyone to think he was new to the Rodeo.

I hear ya', but after all, Jim Brown WAS Jim Brown. What I can't stand are all the kids who THINK they're Jim Brown or Michael Jordan or whoever before they ever do anything. Both of those guys worked their tails off for years to reach the pinnacle of their respective sports. Not many kids can just walk right into a high-level program and think they are just going to take over. Even if they do, they will have to induce others to work hard and play together, or it won't matter for the team how good the "star" is. For that, it doesn't hurt if the would-be star is positive and enthusiastic, and the coach doesn't have to feel like he is pulling teeth in trying to get guys to do what they should.

vut5686#1405392 writes:

in response to johnlg00:

I'm not sure that idea works all that well in football, except perhaps for some free-spirited kick returner or wide receiver. Most of game action for most players consists of constantly repeating a limited series of rote motions which absolutely must be coordinated with everybody else on the team. The repetition of practice is the only way that kind of precision and consistency. If you have prima-donnas running around with the idea that they can loaf in practice and still play, it is poisonous to a whole team. Sure, there are great players out there who can play completely spontaneously, but everybody else NEEDS the practice repetitions, and I just think a coach plays with fire if he is perceived to be taking it easy in practice on "favorite" guys.

Don't disagree with your comments. Who practices best should play. However, who performs the best, in a team concept on Saturday, is who we want on the field. Usually, that will be who works the hardest; it is rare that fans don't question a coach's decision re: who plays. A player, who otherwise works at it, when given a chance just shines in a game atmosphere, should be used. Sometimes that will not be the rah-rah guy in the weight room...which was sort of one point of the article. I am just saying I would rather have a guy who performs on Saturday than a guy who starts a fight in the chow line or tosses water balloons down the sidewalk..just to show how macho he is.

I do agree that, usually, the harder they work...the better they get.

johnlg00 writes:

in response to vut5686#1405392:

Don't disagree with your comments. Who practices best should play. However, who performs the best, in a team concept on Saturday, is who we want on the field. Usually, that will be who works the hardest; it is rare that fans don't question a coach's decision re: who plays. A player, who otherwise works at it, when given a chance just shines in a game atmosphere, should be used. Sometimes that will not be the rah-rah guy in the weight room...which was sort of one point of the article. I am just saying I would rather have a guy who performs on Saturday than a guy who starts a fight in the chow line or tosses water balloons down the sidewalk..just to show how macho he is.

I do agree that, usually, the harder they work...the better they get.

Agree completely that the "gamers" should be identified and should get as much action as they can handle, if they otherwise show themselves to be "team" guys. The thing is, the only way to know who the players are before the games begin is to see how they are in practice, the weight room, and even perhaps the classroom. Coaches will be understandably reluctant to play guys who aren't fulfilling their everyday team responsibilities. The only other way a guy who doesn't practice well gets on the field is if there is almost literally nobody else for the spot. THEN you might discover a guy who is a player even if he is not a "practicer", but you still have to be careful how you handle him in comparison with how you handle the "spear-carriers".

johnlg00 writes:

Just to clarify, when I use the word "enthusiastic", I'm not necessarily talking about bouncing around, laughing and joking all the time, I mean it as the opposite of a guy who has to be dragged into every practice drill or conditioning session, muttering under his breath, putting down teammates and coaches, and generally being a pain in the neck, all because he thinks he's better than everybody else. Some people are just more demonstrative than others, for good or ill, but if guys aren't visibly buying into a program, they can't possibly succeed to their fullest potential.

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