Josh Richardson semifinalist for citizenship award

Tennessee's Jeronne Maymon (34) and Josh Richardson (1) celebrate teammate A.J. Davis (21) scoring against Tennessee Tech on Saturday at Thompson-Boling Arena in Knoxville. UT won the game 84-63. (AMY SMOTHERMAN BURGESS/NEWS SENTINEL)

Photo by Amy Smotherman Burgess

Tennessee's Jeronne Maymon (34) and Josh Richardson (1) celebrate teammate A.J. Davis (21) scoring against Tennessee Tech on Saturday at Thompson-Boling Arena in Knoxville. UT won the game 84-63. (AMY SMOTHERMAN BURGESS/NEWS SENTINEL)

Tennessee’s Josh Richardson recently was named a semifinalist for the Coach Wooden Citizenship Cup, sponsored by Athletes for a Better World.

Out of more than 100 collegiate Division I nominees from all sports, Richardson, a junior from Edmond, Okla., was among 36 student-athletes who made the semifinalist list.

Richardson was one of only five men’s basketball players to be named semifinalists. And he was one of seven semifinalists from the SEC.

The Coach Wooden Citizenship Cup is presented annually to two distinguished athletes one collegiate and one professional who have made the greatest difference in the lives of others. The recipients are athletes of excellence both on and off the field, role models both as performers and persons.

In 2004, legendary UCLA men’s basketball coach John Wooden gave Athletes for a Better World permission to use his name for the award.

Tennessee has produced two professional recipients of the Coach Wooden Citizenship Cup, Peyton Manning in 2005, and Pat Summitt in 2012.

The goal of ABW is to make the Coach Wooden Citizenship Cup the most prestigious award in all of sports. It is unique because it is open to all athletes in all sports and is given to those who have made the greatest difference in the lives of others.

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Comments » 1

johnlg00 writes:

Wow! That sounds like a pretty prestigious award! Josh is undergoing a transformation as a player, showing conclusively that hard, focused work produces improvement. We also always had a sense that he was a substantial young man who would be known and admired even if he had not been a highly-competitive college basketball player. Nice to see that some significant others seem to agree.

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